Commission – James Mitchell, 19 March 1863

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Document forwarding a an army commission for James E. Mitchell of Pennsylvania as 2nd Lieutenant of the 18th US Infantry, from the Adjutant General’s Office in Washington. Mitchell wrote and signed this certified copy of the original document. The original commission was signed by James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant General. The office required personal details from Mitchell, including his age, residence, birth state, and full name. After accepting the commission, Mitchell was to report to the battalion commander.


Adjutant General’s Office

Washington March 19th 1863

Sir

    I forward herewith your commission of

                Second Lieutenant

your receipt and acceptance of which you will please acknowledge without delay reporting at the same time your age and residence when appointed, the State where born, and your full name Correctly Written. Fill up, Subscribe, and return as soon as possible the accompanying oath, duly and carefully executed

     On receipt and acceptance hereof, you will report in Person, for orders, to your Battalion Commander and by letter to the Commander of your Regiment.

                             I am sir very Respectfully,

                                Your Obedient Servant,

                            (signed) James B. Fry

                              Asst Adjutant General

Second Lieutenant James E. Mitchell

         18th Regt U. S. Inft

I certify that the above is a true copy of the Original

                                James E Mitchell

                                2nd Lieut 18th U. S. Inf


James E. Mitchell, from Pennsylvania, enlisted as a private in Company H of the 2nd Battalion, 18th US Infantry, on February 14, 1862. He was subsequently appointed sergeant prior to his commission appointment dated February 19, 1863. His acceptance was duly noted on April 21, 1863, and he served on active duty until his death September 13, 1863, evidently from the bite of a poisonous snake the previous night.

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