Letter – Thomas Jackson, 1 August 1865

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Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson to his wife Lucy, from Gainesville, AL. This letter is the continuation of one written by Thomas on July 30th. He has just arrived in town, and Lucy’s father is busy with preparations to visit Washington, D.C. He writes that there are no African American troops yet occupying the town. He mentions an upcoming meeting with a doctor, whom he hopes will provide some advisement for Thomas and his wife.


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At Home, Aug. 1. 1865.

My Darling,

I have just arrived in town – 5 1/2 O’clk. P.M. – and have but a moment to say half a word & close my letter – I find yr Father busy as forty beehives in full operation, completing his arrangements for his visit to Washington, He has deferred his departure until Thursday, having found it impracticable to get ready earlier. I was glad to see Jimmie, & devoured yr dear charming letter rapturously – Oh my sweet wife, I am too happy to learn that your health is so good, and your spirits so joyous & happy – My Love, you must not suffer anything to disturb or depress you, & believe in my assurances that every body loves, and your husband adores you,

I learn that little Carrie is not so well this evening

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as she was yesterday – Yr Uncle John is “hors de combat” with the breaking out on his ancles – There are no negro troops in town yet, & I do not know that any are expected – I will counsel with Dr Williams to-morrow, or this evening, if I can see him, & advise you of his advice &c. I will try to write a little to you tomorrow, giving you all the news I can gather, at present, I am ignorant of the sayings & doings in town. Susan has returned, & expresses herself charmed with her visit. My best love to Mother, Sister Aunt Bet, all at Kemper, Good ngiht my precious, & may the Good Lord guide & protect you,

Your devoted husband

TKJ


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 30 July 1864

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Post-war letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson to his wife Lucy, from Cedar Bluff, AL. Thomas tells his wife that he has been writing “Proclamation Oaths” for Lucy’s father, who is a judge. Her father has also been working on an application for a “special pardon” for Thomas. The previous day’s paper contained information from the governor on how to apply for one, and how questions would need to be answered for a successful application. Thomas describes the recent weather conditions and how they have affected the crops. They are selling her mother’s cotton in town, for which her father “expects to receive from 20 to 22 cents in gold.” He also mentions a “tournament” held for the entertainment of the local young ladies and gentlemen, and that a friend offered to give him a few hunting dogs to train.


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Cedar Bluff,

Sunday, July 30. 1865.

My precious Wife,

I remained at home last night as I expected, and came up here this morning, bringing little Katy with me to see her mother. I was occupied part of the day yesterday writing off some “Proclamation Oaths” for yr Father, while he drew up my application for “special pardon”; he also prepared applications for a number of other parties – Mine is a master-piece, and, according to my judgement, makes a better showing than any I have seen. Carrie was some better last evening, though quite sick – and I regret I did not learn her condition this morning, for, having to come by the Farm, I forgot to do so. I sent Bettie’s letter to her yesterday by Dr Alexander, (wonder if Mrs Whiteside doesn’t wish she had married him?)

I shall commence sending your mothers cotton to town tomorrow, as the Judge wishes to dispose of it before his departure, & to expediate its delivery there, a wagon has been ordered from the prairie to assist. There are seventeen bales – The Judge expects to receive from 20 to 22 ct in gold for it, which, he says he will pack up with your Mother’s name marked upon it, and will lock it up in the iron safe.

Yesterdays paper, which was not received until

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late, contains a Proclamation by Gov. [missing], issued for the information & guidance of all those applying for “special pardon”, through him; and enumerating certain questions, which the applicant must answer satisfactorily, to insure a favorable consideration of his petition by the Governor – This entails an alteration in, or rather, a postscript added to, our applications – I shall, therefore, go to town Tuesday afternoon to attend to this correction in mine, and to see yr Father off on the following morning. I hope you will receive the letter I sent to you, by Express, yesterday. I discover that some rain fell here yesterday, but not sufficient to do the crop much good – a steady rain for some hours, would be of great service to the growing corn just now. To-day has been unusually cool and delightful, a fine breeze has been blowing all day long, with the sun partially obscured by light clouds.

As I rode from Warsaw Friday evening, I discovered quite a collection of ladies and gentlemen in the distance, whom, I have since concluded, had assembled to celebrate a “Tournament”, as this species of gentle, and joyous pastime, seems to be occupying the attention of the chivalric youths, and damsels fair, in the surrounding neighborhood. Had I been apprised of such an opportunity, I might have entered the lists & essayed a course in honor of her, who, whether

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present or absent, reigns sole queen of my heart.

Tomorrow I should ride out for the purpose of buying some bacon, for the use of this Farm, I hope to secure about 500 lbs @ 10 ct. I shall first apply to Old Mr Wm Little who, if he cannot supply me, may be able to direct my further search.

Yesterday while speaking of dogs in the presence of Mr [McNettly?], I expressed my predilection for pointers & setters, when he spoke up and said he had two or three superior full blooded English setters, which he would take great pleasure in letting me have, if I would train the two puppies & save one of them for him. I accepted the offer at once, and he promised to bring them up, about the 6th prox. when he brings the terrier for Mother.

You are not to be alarmed, for they shall not give you the least inconvenience. And now my precious Love, good night – Do I not love thee my precious one? Go ask the whispering breezes, whose name so oft as [???], is breathed upon their balmy flight. With holy blessings on your darling head, again good night.

Monday July 31, 1865, I have omitted to mention my dear Lucy, in these daily notes, that Major Beauchamp spent a couple of days in Gainesville last week – I met him a few miles from town as I came

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up the first time – He was looking quite [missing] usual, and said, he left his family well, [missing] had reached Macon without accident. Mr Rogers told me Saturday, the Major had failed to sell his house, owing to the exhorbitant price he demands – I did not see Mrs Pool or any of her family when I was down – The fact is, I was only at home early in the morning & at night.

I feel the want of some body to talk to up here; so that if you were here, I doubt if you would ever find any cause for complaint on that score. I started over to Old Bill Little’s this morning, after dispatching three wagons loaded with cotton to town, but before I got quite to his house I met one of his servants, who informed me the the Old Man had gone to Gainesville, so I shall have to goover in the morning – I met with quite a little adventure on the road near Old Mr Daniels, the details of which I must reserve for some future occasion, merely explaining now that I very innocently stumbled upon the rendezvous of a pair of lovers, & temporarily interrupted their assignation. On my return I rode through Warsaw to enjoy the only inviting thing I have, or wish to discover in that wretched place, viz: a cool drink of water. I also called at Mr Kirkland’s to take him to task about some rails he has been appropriating from your Father’s fences. He was not at home – but I shall find him – Last night & this forenoon have been quite cool, rendering outdoors exercises delicious & exhilerating.

I expect to go home tomorrow afternoon, when I shall finish & dispatch this note to you my Love


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Nathaniel Slaughter, 12 September 1865

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Letter written by Captain Nathaniel M. E. Slaughter of Company F, 39th NC Infantry, to Amanda Wiggins (sister of his deceased Sgt. John W. Wiggins), from Cherokee, NC. In this letter, Slaughter declares his love for Amanda, and urges her not to laugh, for he is serious. He writes that although they see each other often, he has chosen to communicate his feelings in a letter because he is a “timid man” and could not properly express his sentiments verbally. He writes that that though he is inferior to her in every way, he hopes that she might love him in return and accept his proposal of marriage. (Spoiler alert: she accepts!)


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Cherok N.C. Sept 12th 1865

Dear Manda,

I hope you will pardon me for this method of communication. I have no doubt you will think it strange why I should take this means of communicating when I see you so often.

Well! I can assign for one reason that – I am a very timid man, and have but a poor “nack” of telling verbally what I wish to be known, hence this communication. Since out last private conversation I have thought much upon the subject then spoken of. My mind has been much occupied with rememberances of the past, and what will likely be my destiny in reference to the subject which I submitted to your consideration. I feel much interested in the matter, and hope you have given the matter a calm and candid consideration and have decided in my favor. If I knew such was the case I would be happy. Manda to make a short story of a long one I have learned to love you. Dont be startled, dont laugh! I am in earnest, and I am in my right mind. If I only knew that the favor was reciprocal and mutual I should be much rejoiced. My dear friend, I have no inducement to offer but an honest heart, and the affections that spring therefrom. You are well acquainted with my character, my pecuniary affairs (as you well know) are quite limited, my moral character is anything but an enviable one and my mental acquirements are but weak. My object in writing you, is to bring, forcibly, to your mind the matter of a reciprocated affection, and what course you will will pursue in refference to the case, of union for life with one so far your inferior. My dear friend, I admit this is a grave question and

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one which carries with a great deal of meaning when viewed in a proper manner. If it was a criminal offense to ask a young lady for her heart and hand, you might have me condemned before the court of conscience, but in this matter, I think I have violated no law, neither human nor divine.

Right here let me remind you, that much of my future destiny for weal or woe depends upon the action you take in the premises. If it shall accord with your feeling and notions of economy to accept my proposition as heretofore submitted, I shall be happy in that respect, on the other hand you shall decide against me, I cannot say I will be miserable, yet I shall feel much disappointed, at having lost so valuable a prize.

My Dear friend. Let me remind you that no overtures of mine, nor sympathies for me should influence you in my favor. your actions should be from pure motives. Economy should be well studied. your own interest should be thought of seriously and not mine, It is the duty of every young lady to study their own interest in matters of this Caste, and not be influenced by sophistry used by their friends to her detriment. Self preservation, and self interest is the first law of nature, and we should cling to it very tenaciously even if it does wound our friends if duty demands our actions for our own honest interest. And right here let me remark, my dear friend, that if upon a candid consideration upon the subject, and a fair examination into the circumstances connected with the case, you disdain my suit and cast me off, I shall not have the least hard thought against you, and I am glad that I am that liberal in my heart I shall never as[k] you why you did it

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but still entertain for you that high admiration which I have long had for you. Think you not that I am so unfeeling as to have envy against one who would not comply with my wishes. [???] I shall be much disappointed. I have spun out this letter far beyond what I anticipated when I began to write, but just bear with me a little further, and shall hear the signal of the whole matter. I love you and I cant help it. I much desire that the favor could be returned and that circumstances may so turn out that there may be no hindrances to our union for life. What say ye. Be calm, dont get out of humor I am all “right” and hope you are the same. I know you will think me a strange specimen of human nature, well I have curious notions some times.

Manda my dear friend If I have committed an error in this matter and toped your patience to an extreme, do for pitties sake forgive me.

After I hand you this letter I will give you time to study its contents and then I shall be to see you on the subject of which it treats from what I learn I am rather afraid to come to your house much upon a courting expedition.

Now Manda, If this does not meet your aprobation for goodness sakes dont be mad with me just impute it to an error of the head and not of the for I would not intrude upon your generosity for nothing conceivable.

I will ask you again to forgive this long Epistle be sure and read it all through if you can I write in a hurry and have taken no pain in my chirography. There is no sacrifice [???] I would not make for your sake, and be assured, that in

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all your calamities you have my heart felt sympathies Manda I have one favor now to ask of you And that is this. This letter is intended for no eye but your own, and ask of you that it neither be shown or spoken of to any person living. you may if you please when you examine its contents commend it to the flames or lay it away where no eye will see it but your own this request I hope you will grant me. I will close by saying I have the honor to subscribe myself your devoted friend S.


Nathaniel Mateson Eddington Slaughter, was born c. July 1830 in TN. He was educated at Maryville College and became a teacher before moving to Robbinsville, N.C. He enrolled in Company F of the 39th NC Infantry as a private, ca. Feb. 1862, but was soon commissioned and rose to the rank of captain. He survived the war, and returned to Cherokee, NC, where in 1865 he married Amanda Wiggins (the sister of his deceased Sgt. John W. Wiggins). The couple had five children, three daughters and two sons, prior to his death at age 77, June 26, 1908. Amanda survived her husband by eleven years, dying April 18, 1919.

Letter – William Pitzer, 25 January 1865

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Letter written by Private William B. Pitzer of Company E, 2nd Battalion VA Reserves, to his father, from Richmond, VA. Pitzer is exhausted after being on duty for nearly 25 days. Though he is serving for a “noble cause,” he hopes that war will be over soon and he can return home. He asks his father to pray for him so that he will not be tempted to sin, and passes on the tragic news that his best friend died in a hospital at Camp Lee. Pitzer has applied for a furlough, but is not sure if he will get it. He is interested in transferring to the artillery. He inquires about a pair of shoes and new socks, as his have worn thin from all the marching. Pitzer concludes the letter when he has to go on post, and sends his love to his family back home.


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Richmond Jan 25th 65

My Dear Pa

I received your kind and affectionate letter yesterday and as I have time this morning I hasten to answer it I was so glad to hear that you were all well at home I am well but I need to rest very much as I am nearly broken down I have been on duty twenty five days and nights and have not been releived but two nights we stand on two hours and off four have to walk our beat all the time and are not allowed to rest our guns on the ground it is hard to bear but I am serving in a noble cause

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but I hope this cruel war will soon be over and we can return to our homes and enjoy the privelidges denied us and if we never meet on earth I pray that we may meet in heaven where loved ones have gone Pa pray for me that I may not be led into temptation and sin. I have the sad news to inform you of the death of my friend Tom Ballard he died in the hospital at camp Lee I could not get to see him I was on duty and could not get a pass to see him he was one of the best friends I had and it is hard to part with him. I have applied for a furlough for fifteen days I do not know whether I will get it or not I hope that I will

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you said in your letter you had written to Mr Hord to aid me in getting a transfer to the artillery I will be off of duty tonight and I will go and see him tomorrow and try and get it you [send?] the shoes by Capt Breckinridge send me a

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pair of socks walkin so much in the shoes I have has worn my socks very thing. I am grieved to hear of the death of Poor Neely it is a great affliction but it is time for me to go on post I will bring my letter to a close kiss all the children for me give my love to cousin Jennie and except a large portion for yourself I never received the letter you directed to camp lee

your affectionate son

WB Pitzer

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give my love to all the black ones write soon Tell sister Fannie to write me a letter your son WP


William B. Pitzer enlisted in Company E of the 2nd Battalion VA Reserve Infantry, circa July, 1864. He served in the Department of Richmond, in Brigadier General P. T. Moore’s Brigade, Brigadier General George W. C. Lee’s Division at the date of this letter. The unit was paroled April 9, 1865 after its April 6th capture at Saylers Creek.

Letter – Daniel Dodge, 14 April 1865

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Letter written by Private Daniel C. Dodge of Company D, 26th MI Infantry, near City Point, VA. Dodge is writing from the hospital, and feels fine though he hates to see his fellow soldiers with amputated limbs. Dodge believes the war is nearly finished, as Robert E. Lee has surrendered. He hopes to return home soon, as he does not wish to remain in the hospital nor return to war. Dodge describes the fine weather conditions, and how the cheerful land is marred by the graves of thousands of soldiers. He also writes of a speech made by Lincoln in which the President asked God to bless the living soldiers.


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Vir.[ginia] April the 4 1865

Sitty Point Well how Do you all Do this fine after noon I hope you air all Well as for me I am fealing first rate to Day though I hate to Se So many of our Boys with their hands and legs cut of But it looks as though it was Pla[y]ed out for old Lee has Sir rendered his hole amry he was not so mutch of a Copperhead Be what he would give up when he was used up So he Could fight no longer So I think the war will Stop Soon I think I Shal Be home Bfore the 4 of July But how mutch

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Soon ner I Cant tel And the Soon ner the Better But I may have to Stay longer than I think But five mont[h]s will Soon

Pas a way I think I Shal not Stay hear mutch longer for I Dont like it mutch hear But I Dont know But I Shal have to go to my regt to get a way from hear I Dont

mean to go to work hear if I can help it for if I Do I Shal have to Stay hear But it is Pleasant hear to Day I went out this morning Before sun rise

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and looked around and I could se the cherry trees in Blossom this looked cheaful But look in an other Direction and you can se the graves of four teen thousand of our Boys laid lo By the Cirsed Rebs and Copperheads But they to have Ben heaped in Piles to Be rememBered as infamos Devels that air not fit to liv or to Dy and they will Be rememBerD with Contempt while

time inDures and all [???] uphold them god Bless the wounded SolDierS and the union old abe came and staed through the hole fight I saw him going

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in to the field after they had taken Petersburg he made a speach to the Boys But he Could not Bring to life the noBle Boys that fel on the field But he cold [called] on god to Bless the liveing

April the 4

well I will stop and send my love to all the friend hopeing to se you all agane Before long it seams a g[r]ate while since I have herd from home and i cant tel you whare to Direct yet may Be I can when I right agane good By for this time Daniel Dodge

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Dont fret a Bout the Bruss [Bruise?] for I am all right


Daniel C. Dodge was from Pine River, MI. He enlisted at age 18 on August 2, 1862 as a private in Company D of the 26th MI Infantry. He mustered in September 15, 1862 for a 3 year term. Dodge was wounded on April 7 at Farmville, VA leading to his discharge in Philadelphia, PA on June 24, 1865. Dodge was not well educated, his spelling mostly phonetic. Though he dates this letter to April 4, 1865 he most likely means the 14th, considering he references Lee’s surrender on April 12.

Letter – James Cooper, 27 January 1865

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Letter written by Confederate Captain James Cooper, Assistant Adjutant General for General John Bell Hood, to Captain Francis M. Farley of the 8th FL Infantry, from the headquarters of the Army of Tennessee near Tupelo, MS. Cooper begins by mentioning an “ill-fated” campaign into Tennessee, then encourages Francis to continue fighting despite recent losses. Cooper is determined to not give in to depression, for he feels confident in the Confederacy’s victory. He describes the current movements of corps commanded by: Benjamin F. Cheatham, Stephen D. Lee, Alexander P. Stewart, and Nathan B. Forrest. Cooper recently took on the responsibilities of the A. A. G., and has been busy furloughing troops. He gives Francis the unfortunate news that his old brigade has not done well recently.


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HdQrs. Army of Tenn

                            Tupelo, Miss Jan. 27 1865

My dear friend

     More than a month has passed since I received your last letter – it reached me during our ill-fated Campaign into Tennessee. It is useless to attempt to excuse myself for not answering sooner, for though I may have had some reasons for not writing at times, and at other times had no opportunity to write, yet I should before this time replied to your letter. But believe me, my friend, if I did neglect to write, I did not fail to think often of you – to sympathize deeply with you in your troubles, an account of which I received in your letter. It is a consolation to know that you were enabled to offer gallant resistance to the foul invaders of your home and that you succeeded in punishing to some extent the Yankee wretches. I am proud of your conduct on the occasion; it was however only what I would have expected of you.

I can appreciate & respect your feelings, Farley, at the time you wrote to me – but you must cheer up. Do not yield to gloomy feelings. The spirit displayed by the inhabitants of your little town [Marianna, FL] of itself (however sad in result) shows what the Yankees have to do before they can accomplish their ends. I have witnessed recently much to discourage; our army beaten & disgraced – disorganized and suffering. But I will not yield to depression. I have faith in our final success the justice of our cause and feel certain of success. And at all events let us go

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down with colors flying.

Cheatham’s & Lee’s Corps of this army are now en route for Augusta. I shall leave in a day or two. Stewart’s Corps and Forrest’s Cavy will be left in this country under command of Lt. Gen. Dick Taylor. I do not know who will command the army in Georgia, but suppose Beauregard will command in person.

After the army reached this place I was very busy for a week, both night & day, furloughing the troops, having all the work of the A.A.G.’s office thrown temporarily on my shoulders. I assure I am glad to be relieved by the movement of the troops from the irksome task. Col. McDonald of your old regt [1st Florida Inf.] returned to the army a few days since, after 2 years’ absence; has tendered his resignation & left on 30 days leave of absence. Your old brigade [William B. Bates’ (Finlay’s)] I am sorry to say did not gain much reputation on the recent campaign. To Bates’ Division is ascribed the misfortunes of the Army. They will do better another time.

It is so cold that I can’t write more. I am in a tent and my fire won’t burn. I only write to you now because I leave here tomorrow & do not know when I shall write again. By the way I wrote to you twice before receiving your last letter. So you owe me one.

                       Sincerely yours,

                                        Cooper


James Cooper was originally commissioned as a captain in Co. D of the 1st LA Infantry, in March of 1861. He was captured near Pensacola, FL and sent to Ft. Warren Prison in Boston Harbor before being exchanged. After returning to duty with his regiment he was assigned sometime in August 1863 to duty as an inspector’ general at General Braxton Bragg’s headquarters. When General Joseph E. Johnston assumed command in 1864, Captain Cooper remained on the commanding general’s staff. In July 1864, when General John Bell Hood was made army commander, Cooper served in the same capacity again on his staff.

Francis M. Farley was originally commissioned as a 2nd lieutenant in Co. E of the 1st FL Infantry on April 5 of 1861. He was captured at Santa Rosa Island, FL later that year, and imprisoned at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, where he met and became good friends with Captain James Cooper. After being released from prison, Farley was wounded at Fredericksburg, VA, and later resigned November 2, 1863. He subsequently served with the 8th FL Infantry.

General Orders – No. 18, 31 July 1865

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General Orders No. 18, issued from the Union Headquarters in New Orleans, allowing soldiers to retain their arms after the war’s end if they pay for them.


Soldiers allowed to retain their arms

GENERAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS,

No. 18. DEPARTMENT OF LOUISIANA AND TEXAS

New Orleans, La., July 31, 1865

I. In accordance with instructions from the War Department, all soldiers honorably mustered out of the service, who desire to take advantage of General Orders, No. 101, War Department, Adjutant General’s Office, current series, authorizing them to retain their arms and accouterments on paying therefor their value, must signify their intention before leaving the filed, that it may be entered and charged on their muster-out rolls. The prices fixed by the Ordnance Department are as follows:

Muskets (all kinds, with or without accouterments) Six Dollars.

Spencer Carbines, (with or without accouterments) Ten Dollars.

All other Carbines and Revolvers, (with or without accouterments,) Eight Dollars.

Sabres and Swords, (with or without belts,) Three Dollars.

II. In order that no delay may be occasioned in the payment of mustered out troops, when they arrive at their respective places of enlistment, proper remarks will be made on the muster-out rolls of balance of clothing account, and traveling distance from the State rendezvous where they were mustered out, to place of enlistment.

Company officers, Commissaries and Assistant Commissaries of Musters will be held responsible that the proper remarks are made on the muster-out rolls as directed in the above order.

BY ORDER OF MAJOR-GENERAL E. R. S. Canby:

WICKHAM HOFFMAN,

Major, Assistant Adjutant General

Official:

Letter – Asbury Fouts, 16 January 1865

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Letter written by Private Asbury Fouts of Company I, 9th IA Infantry, to his parents, from a camp near Nashville, TN, during Hood’s Tennessee Campaign. Fouts writes about marching out to the breastworks under the command of General James B. Steedman, where they could see Confederate rifle pits. The brigade was ordered to draw the Confederates out, though heavy fire caused them to leave before doing so. Two days later they were ordered to Fort Negley to hold the breastworks. On December 19th, 1864, they started for Murfreesboro, and went as far as Huntsville, AL, when they heard the Confederates were at Decatur. A hard march brought them to the Tennessee River, which they crossed on gunboats. The Confederates shelled them, and the town was eventually evacuated.


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Camp Near Nashville

Jan the 16th 1865     

Dear Parents

It is with pleasure that I seat myself down to write you a few lines, for I have not had time to write until now. For about 6 or 7 weeks I wrote you a few lines while at Courtland but do not know whether you received them or not. I wish I had kept an account of our movements since we came to Nashville. I have forgotten all the dates, so I will not attempt to give an account of the Battle of Nashville. Four days after we came to Nashville we drew our arms for the defense of the city, and marched out to the breastworks on the left under Gen.

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Steedman’s command. The Rebs’ rifle pits were in plain view about a mile and a half off. We remained in this position for 8 days without disturbance from the enemy. I believed they would have stayed there all winter without attacking us if we had not drove them out. One day our brigade [Col. A. G. Mallory’s, Capt. C. C. Cox’s Battalion] was ordered out on skirmish for the purpose of drawing them out of their works. Our reg[iment] advanced along in front, with the reserves down under the hill. We fought them until the [fire] got too hot for us, and fell back slowly without accomplishing our purpose. The man standing next to me was wounded. Just before the fight one of the boys gave his revolver to his comrade and said, boys, this is the last time I will have of

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speaking to you. Pointing to them, he said there is the Rebels, they will kill me. He was shot through the neck and killed instantly. In two days afterward our corps was ordered over to the right, or rather in front of Fort Negley, to hold the breastworks. That day our forces attacked their works. A heavy cannonading was kept up all day. The second day still heavy infantry fire – very heavy. The fight became general all around. Our company was not in the fight at all. [We were] held as reserves in the breastworks. It is hardly necessary for me to try to give a description of our brave boys fought; it is old news to you before this time. The Rebs fought

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well. On the 19th of December we started for Murfreesboro, there taking the cars, went down as far as Huntsville, Alabama. There we heard the Rebs was at Decatur. We started for that place on the 25th. After marching through mud knee deep, wading swamps & rivers in cold weather, we reached the Tennessee River opposite Decatur about noon on the 28th. [We] crossed over on the gunboats above the city. The boats played on them while we prepared for a night attack. They shelled us a while, but did not pay much attention to them. About ten o’clock they evacuated the town. It was well fortified. It is getting dark. I will close for the present.

[balance of letter missing – unsigned]


Asbury Fouts, from Taylor County, IO, enlisted at age 19 in Company I of the 9th IA Infantry on October 19, 1864. When en route to the 15th Army Corps (W. T. Sherman’s Army of the Tennessee), via Nashville, Fouts was assigned for temporary combat duty at Nashville along with other recruits and also veterans returning to active service. He was placed in Colonel A. G. Mallory’s brigade, Capt. C. C. Cox’s battalion, and participated in the reconnaissance of December 13th along the Murfreesboro Pike toward the Rains farm. Mallory’s brigade suffered 10 total casualties. Fouts joined the 9th Iowa in March 1865, and was discharged at Louisville, KY On July 18, 1865.

Letter – James Peckham, 4 July 1865

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Letter written by former Colonel James Peckham to his mother, from St. Louis, Missouri. He and his wife have both been ill lately. He writes that he is still working as tobacco inspector, but will soon be licensed to practice law and will be going into partnership with a friend named Selah Squires. Peckham hopes that his wife will be able to go east in the summer, as the conditions may be better for her health.


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July 4th 1865

My Dear Mother,

I have not heard from any of you in New York since my return. I have been night sick with a billious attack but am better, and now Kate is down with a severe dysentary. The weather is very hot and I never saw so many flies before. I never got that business fixed up until last saturday and before I could get so that Staunton would act, had to remoddle the the whole thing. Instead of one fifth I only now got one sixth. I though that much of a loaf, better than none at all. I am still Tobacco Inspector, but business is dull. I shall be licensed to practice law next week and am going in partnership with an old intimate friend of George, named Selah Squires. Mr Squires is from New York City recently, & has to settle somewhere west for his health. I regard him as a good enough lawyer for me to go into business with.

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I want Kate to go East this summer & hope she will. Ask Nic if she cant get board somewhere in the Country where she can get fresh butter milk & chickens. She is getting weak mighty early in the season & I am afraid she cant stand it here.

Kiss Fan Belle & all the youngones for me and spank Fan besides once in the while

My best to Clark & all & everybody and each one, and the whole squad, and Eliza.

I see Nic & George Bennett have struck ile. Bully for ile.

God bless you & all the rest, Remember me to Sarah & Henry.

Love to all.

Good Bye

Affectionately Your Cub

James.


James Peckham was a member of the Missouri Legislature before the Civil War and was a strident Unionist when the state was debating to secede or not. He left the legislature and organized the 8th MO Regiment. Peckham served as the 8th MO Regiment’s Lt. Col. and led the regiment at Shiloh and Pittsburg Landing, TN, and at Jackson, MS. He later went on to lead the 29th MO. After the war he published a book on the history of the war in Missouri and General Nathaniel Lyon. He passed away in 1869 and is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis, MO.

Letter – James Peckham, 29 January 1865

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Letter written by former Colonel James Peckham to his mother, from St. Louis. Peckham is now a tobacco inspector, and he and his wife Kate have a new house. Governor Thomas C. Fletcher has promised Peckham that he will stay in this new role, after long talks with the Commissioner of Internal Revenue and the Secretary of the Treasury in Washington. Peckham writes about he and his wife’s efforts to furnish their new home, and talks about the possibility of visits from a few friends. Also enclosed is a letter from Kate to Peckham’s mother, in which she also mentions their new house and the recent cold weather.


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Saint Louis January 29. 1865

My Dear Mother

Kate & I are amusing ourselves this evening, writing letters – she to her own mother & I thought I would write you. It may be very possible that I shall go to Washington City in a week or so upon some business connected with my office, and if I do I shall return by the way of New York in order to see you. Kate & I are both well & we are now at house-keeping – got a nice place & continually accumulating something in the way of furniture. I think I shall Keep my office – Governor Fletcher when in Washington about a month ago called on the Commissioner of Internal Revenue & the Secretary of the Treasury, & had a long talk about me, in which the promised him I should not be removed. That is all I ask of the Governor, is to keep me where I am & he has promised to do so & is trying to do so. I dont think I shall be disturbed at all.

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Kate & I make a great fit of it, at marketing. She knows nothing about meat & I know but little, but we manage to be very lucky & get good stuff without knowing it until it is cooked up. However, we are improving & have a good girl. you would laugh to see us. We have plenty of room & but little furniture – but we are gathering a piece here & a piece there & I hope in a month or two we will be prepared to see somebody if that somebody should choose to call on us. I shall not be surprised if Nic comes west this spring. I would like to see him here and will be prepared to entertain him. Nic. Raynor tells me he bought quite a bill of good of Nic. It might do good to Nic to come out here. I know everybody here & can trot him around in double quick military style. I hope you are getting stronger & in better health. Kiss all the young ones for me. Give my love to everybody May God bless you all. Yours Affectionately

Jim

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Dear Mother,

James has told you about everything I believe that would interest you – we are really housekeeping at last. I teased James into it – James said I had “House” on the brain and at last told me if I would find a house we would go to housekeeping, and I found the house and we are quite settled down in it. I enjoy this way of living much better than boarding How is Amanda and the baby – has she named the little girl yet? I often think of you all and should like to see you. I have purposed writing to you and Amanda for a long time, but as usual have been negligent. James is growing so fleshy you will scarcely know him. During the past week the weather has been very cold, to day is warmer. I shall be glad to hear from you and Amanda. Kiss the children for me. Give my love to Miss Eliza Amanda and everybody else accept much yourself from

Yours affectionately Kate.


James Peckham was a member of the Missouri Legislature before the Civil War and was a strident Unionist when the state was debating to secede or not. He left the legislature and organized the 8th MO Regiment. Peckham served as the 8th MO Regiment’s Lt. Col. and led the regiment at Shiloh and Pittsburg Landing, TN, and at Jackson, MS. He later went on to lead the 29th MO. After the war he published a book on the history of the war in Missouri and General Nathaniel Lyon. He passed away in 1869 and is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis, MO.