Letter – Robert Ardry, 2 June 1864

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Letter written by Sergeant Robert G. Ardry of Company B, 111th IL Volunteer Infantry, to his father from near the battlefront in Georgia. Ardry writes of the campaign to Dallas, GA and describes the organization of the line of battle, which extended over ten miles. The Union forces built breastworks covered with brush to conceal them from charging troops. The Confederates suffered heavy losses. Ardry also writes of another engagement while his regiment was on the skirmish line. Despite feeling exhausted from several straight days of heavy fighting, Ardry writes that “things are going very well for us now.”


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Near line of battle Georgia June 2d 1864

Dear Father

I will now pencil you a few lines that you may know that I am still well although we have been in some hot places during the last week We left Kingston on the 23rd and marched again on the right flank, keeping 5 to 10 miles west of the RR till the afternoon of the 26th, when we came up to the Rebs in force at a town called Dallas, 10 miles west of Marietta. The line of battle was then formed that night 15th Army Corps (Logan) on the extreme right; 16th (Dodge) next on our left 4th (Stanton), next 20th (Hooker), next and Schofield on the RR. This line of battle was over 10 miles long and fighting has been going on every day since some place on the line. Our brigade had

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a very hot place till yesterday morning on the night of the 26th We built miles of breastworks and the next morning found us in three lines of battle The 111th had the front line; heavy skirmishing all day Co. C was on this skirmish line and had two men killed and two wounded The skirmishers are advanced 200 yards in front of the lines and lie behind logs and trees and shoot at the Reb skirmishers If an advance is being made the skirmishers give the alarm Well, at 4 o’clock P.M. the Rebs made a charge on our lines The center of the attack was on the 83rd Indiana joining us on the right Our works was built after night and we covered the clay over with brush and they did not know that we had anything of the kind They came up bravely and when within 75 yards and our skirmishers all in the word fire was given Our line for ¼ of a mile was

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one sheet of fire. This broke their lines, but they rallied and on they came waving their flag, but we just more than shot them down Their flag fell several times They got it within 15 steps of our trenches when they fled They carried off many of their wounded, especially officers, but many wounded and killed fell into our hands They had all sorts of wounds One man had his leg shot clean off with a cannon ball I thought the roar of artillery and musketry at Resaca was bad enough but it was nothing to this. We had all advantages The 111th did not lose a man The 83rd Ind. lost 3 in the charge They also charged our lines about one mile to our left at the same time but were repulsed Reb loss is estimated at three thousand At dark of the 30th it came Co. B’s time to go on

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skirmish line for the next 24 hours The night was pretty quiet but with day shooting commenced We were within 300 yards of their breastworks We had holes dug behind logs and trees and lay in them with our guns cocked and fingers on triggers And the moment they showed themselves we sent three or four shots at them At dark we were relieved None of us got hurt On the 1st of June there was several heavy attacks on the lines The 15th Army Corps relieved Hooker and he moved still farther to the left We are now lying back as reserve, another brigade being in the front Our brigade was in the front five days at Dallas and we were pretty well wore out sometimes up all night The Rebs made 7 charges after night one night mostly on Dodge This night we did not sleep any but I must stop Things are going very well for us now But it is thought by some that the fight will last sometime It is 25 or 30 miles to Atlanta. One of the McConnell boys the youngest was killed a few days ago Our reg. so far here has lost 5 killed 8 or 9 wounded Lieut. Col. Black being among the later His is a flesh wound in the leg We get plenty of rations The most of the boys are well I do not know when I will get a chance to mail this but will the first chance Write soon So good By one and all.

                                             R G Ardry


Robert Ardry was born in Muskingum, OH. He enlisted in Lively Grove, IL, as a sergeant on August 13, 1862 in Co. B of the 111th Illinois Volunteer Infantry at the age of 27. He was captured at the Battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864. After being held at Andersonville Prison, GA, he was paroled on September 27, 1864. Following the war he lived in Oakdale, IL, and died May 30, 1922.

Letter – Linsey Wills, 10 September 1864

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Letter written by Private Linsey T. Wills of Company K, 10th VA Cavalry, to his sister, from a camp near Ream’s Station. Wills is encamped at Ream’s Station. He mentions shelling on the James River and near Petersburg. Wills lists articles of clothing he is in need of. The latter part of the letter is addressed to Wills’ brother George. Wills believes that if George B. McClellan is elected president, the war will likely be settled. Wills also expresses skepticism at the capture of Atlanta.


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Camp near Ream’s Station

                           Sept 10  1864

Dear Sister

I received your letter a few days since & would have written to you before now, but forgot it till yesterday, tho’ will not procrastinate longer. This leaves me very well. We are now picketing at Ream’s. Our regt. went on [duty] yesterday. I did not go. Abe had got back & wanted to go, so I let him have my horse to ride, as his horse was sent home. There has been nothing transpired of an interesting character since we got here that I know of. There has been heavy shelling on the James this morning, tho’ I reckon it is from gunboats. Also more shelling than usual near or at Petersburg, tho’ I have not heard the

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result of it. Things are quiet along our lines, so far as I know. I did not expect that Henry [younger brother] would hurry to go in the army & if I was him, I would not do them any good, for he ought to be discharged. I am glad the George got home. I don’t know when I can get home, for I keep well, & my horse is nearly as fat as when I got back from home. I keep well. Tell Mary H. that I told Abe that when he went home for his horse that I wanted him to go to Bedford & get me a pair of pants & go to see Mr. H. He said he was afraid; that if I was along he would go, but to go by his self was too big undertaking for him. Tell her that if he came, that I will have to come

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with him. When he comes, I expect to want you to send me a pair of pants, & the best way will be for you to send them by Preatch & he can carry them to Nelson’s & she can get them from them, tho’ I will let you know. I drew a nice pair the other day and sent them by Abe. Have also a pair of boot tops, & a fine Yankee spoon. I will have them sent home soon. How is my horse. I must close. Sent by L. T. Hills. Well, George, I was very glad to get a letter from you & hear you was at home. I would like to be at home myself, but it seems that I make slow speed at going. We have had two heavy fights since I saw you, tho’ I came out all right, & I intend to

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work the thing on the safest honorable scheme to save my barke [skin]. It is sorter my opinion, if Maclelen [McClellan] is president, that if he offers state’s rights, the next spring they will go back into the union & the fight settled, & if they don’t do that, it is my opinion that the Yankees will flog us at once, & drive the thing to a close. There is no more that will interest you. It has been said that Atlanter [Atlanta] was re-captured but I don’t believe it. Write soon & give me the nuse [news]. Your brother,     

                                         L.T. Wills

p.s. I would like to be at the meeting. You must try to make a good thing of it for yourself, yours, etc.


Linsey T. Wills was born in 1837 in Bedford, VA. He enlisted in 1861 and served in T.C. Jordan’s heavy artillery until he was transferred to Company K. He served in the Confederate Army until the surrender at Appomattox. After the war he moved to Texas and worked as an engineer. He married Texas native Mary Simmons in 1870 and raised a family. He died in 1914 from a heart attack following an automobile accident and is buried in Weimar, TX.