Letter – John Daniels, 13 August 1863

2015.002.125

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Private John S. Daniels of Company B, 2nd NH Volunteer Infantry, to his siblings, from the camp at Point Lookout, MD. Daniels tells his siblings that he has time to write due to the current foul weather. A terrible thunderstorm came up the night before and blew over several tents. Daniels asks how the draft is faring in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, and wonders if any of his family members have joined. He says that he has plenty of rations, and describes the food he has been eating recently. He also describes shooting “Grays” at Gettysburg, comparing it to shooting ducks. Daniels mentions that he will receive his monthly wages soon.


-Page 1-

Camp of 2nd N.H. St. Mary’s Co.

Point Lookout Md. Aug 13th 63

Dear Brother and Sister

As it is rainy, and I havent much to do I thought I would write you a few lines and let you know I am alive and about as cross as they make them.

Here I am in the land of milk and Honey, without a cent of money, every think a plenty, and pockets all empty only one old handkerchief an old jack knife and an old wallet with Mt in all the partings. but never mind. if I dont have it I wont spend it. for they wont trust the and with a Pint of Whiskey out of their sight. but I can fool them once in

-Page 2-

a while. make them believe I am a big mans son, or some big Generals waiter and then they will trust me, and I guess they will mistrust me one of these days if I milk their cows as much as I have since I came here but they are most all Secesh here and I dont know as there is any hurt getting their milk is there?

We had one of the awfulest thunder showers I ever dreamed of last night it Hailed and the wind blew and such thunder and lightning I never saw or heard. down came tents and away went things that were in them. the old Drs. tent blew over and he got as wet as a drowned rat. wernt I glad? some lay and hung onto their tents to hold them up, and some let them go and lay and took it. but mine is lik the wise mans house the wind and storm dont affect it.

Well Frank how is the draft going on in Mass and N.H. have they drafted in N.H. yet and who are the lucky ones I know that are coming? dont I hope it will be some of my

-Page 3-

Cousins! I wish I could pick the men from Hopkinton wouldnt I make some of the secesh start?

Well! I dont know as I have much news to write now. for it is only a few days since I wrote to you. My health is better than it was a week ago. I have got so I can eat a good share of my rations. if I can have plenty of [???] and milk to go with them. I went the other day and got about 4 Qts of damsons, and I go round and beg sugar to sweeten them, and it make very good eating. or would if I had some of Marms Butter, and some Pumpkin Pie to top off with—————— I heard from George a few days ago. he wrote me Father had a sore hand and couldnt work. have you heard any thing of it? I hope it wont be sore for long for it is a bad time to have sore hands now.

How is Tyler getting along now? did he go Trouting while he was in N.H. and did he shoot any Stripers while he was there. he aught to have been out at Gettysburg, and he could have had some Grays to shoot at. I had a

-Page 4-

good chance to try my skill there. got so I could fetch one nearly every time. I dont think I wasted as many shots as I have before now on a gray [duck] at Home.

I want you or Tyler to send me a box of Maple Sugar any where from 25 to 50 lbs I would send home but you can get it cheaper and better in Boston Market than they can there, and they have it all packed ready to send you might mail it over a little and mark on it Keep dry. and send it by express send a bill of it and what you pay per pound Express &c and I will send you the pay for it as soon as we are paid off. they say we are going to be paid next week. if we aint we will the first of Sept and then we will get four months pay.

Direct to John S. Daniels

Co. B 2nd N.H. Vols

Martins Brigade Washington D.C.

Point Lookout, MD

Love to all, write soon and remember your Brother, (write when you send the Box

John

-Page 2, Upside down across top-

I will send you a shell or two that I picked up when I were out on picket would send you more if they were [dentures?]

-Page 1, Upside down across top-

When you write home tell them I am well and shall write before long if I can get any paper and stamps. I sent the last stamp I had today but guess I can get one to send this, and I dont want to write any more till I get some answers.


John S. Daniels, age 21, from Hopkinton, NH, enlisted on August 9, 1862 at Hopkinton as a private in Company B of the 2nd NH Infantry. He was wounded on June 3, 1864 at Cold Harbor, VA, and discharged at Concord, NH on May 17, 1865. Later Daniels became a member of G.A.R. Post 120, Lowell, MA. He died March 12, 1910.

Letter – Albert Wilson, 3 September 1864

2015.002.073

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Surgeon Albert Wilson of the 113th OH Volunteer Infantry, to his father, from the 113th headquarters in Jonesboro, GA. Wilson writes that they have destroyed the Macon railroad, and mentions the constant skirmishing on their march from Atlanta. The Union troops were able to drive the Confederates back. As the Confederates evacuated Atlanta, they destroyed their magazines, ammunition, and locomotives along the way. Wilson writes they will continue to pursue the Confederates, as General Sherman is not the type to rest while there is still work to be done. Wilson hopes that the war will soon be over, but is mortified that “Rebels of the free states” are joining together to resist the draft.


-Page 1-

Hd Qrs 113th OVI

Jonesboro Georgia Sept 3d – 1864

Dr Father

We are now at the above named place 20 miles from Atlanta (by Rail) on the Macon RR which we have destroyed in a great measure for a number of miles both in front & rear. About 8 days since we cut loose from atlanta moving with 15 days Rations passing to the south of Atlanta and striking the R.R. at Rough & Ready about 8 miles from this place & now to our rear. During this movement we had constant skirmishing as we were closely watched and entirely surrounded by rebel cavalry. Our movment when first discovered was mistaken for a retreat and they detached 30 thousand men to take care of us On Sept 1st we came up and found the enemy entrenched along the R.R. Our Corps was ordered to attack which they did and succeeded with comparatively small loss in driving them from their works & capturing many prisoners & 8 pieces artillery And putting the army to flight much of this success is attributable to our division and not a little to our brigade. Pursuit was made at the earliest convenient moment and since then we have no reliable news

-Page 2-

but brisk artillery firing 6 or 8 miles distant was heard last eve and nearly all day today. The rumor last circulated in Camp says that the 4th Corps attacked on yesterday and the rebel army now reinforced by the force left back at Atlanta and in trenched and were repulsed but both the armies are now said to be in trenched and a rebel deserter just in says the rebs intend to attack today. Official news of the occupation of Atlanta on yesterday at 11 oclock reached us today the Rebel army having evacuated the previous night. They blew up their magazines and burned 80 car loads of ammunition & destroyed several locomotives. The latest rumor is that the 14th Corps will return to atlanta I do not think we will rest however until the Rebel army in our front is completely routed & I cannot say that I have any desire to stop until the work is thoroughly accomplished. Sherman’s not the man to desist or rest for an hour while there is work to be done. I have been unwell for the past 2 weeks but have still kept on duty. I am very anxious to hear from Cossins but shall not be able to for the present the 23d Corps passed up to our left yesterday eve

-Page 3-

I have strong hopes that the war will soon be over and we will be permitted once more to return to civil life. I am very much mortified to learn that the peace party or rather the rebels of the free states are banding themselves together for the avowed purpose of resisting the draft. Political demagogues who mislead them however will some day (when the soldiers who have fought the battles of the country) be brought to justice and made to regret the day they ever gave aid and comfort to the rebels in arms. We in the army are of the opinion that as the war democrats have had sufficient strength to nominate a war ticket at the Chicago Convention that there need be but little fear of resistance to the draft to come off on the 6th inst Weather here has been escepively hot & dry untill today. Today we have had copious rains. The Mail is about to leave and I must close

I remain your unworthy son

A. Wilson

Col Jesse H Wilson


Albert Wilson originally enrolled at age 32 as an assistant surgeon with the 1st OH Volunteer Infantry on April 16, 1861. He was mustered out on August 16, 1861, but rejoined them immediately and served with the regiment until he was discharged for promotion on September 30, 1863. He then joined the 113th OH Volunteer Infantry as a surgeon and served until mustering out at Louisville, KY on July 6, 1865. His father Jesse was a former Ohio militia colonel.

Letter – Frederick Doten, 1 September 1864

2015.002.040b

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Lieutenant Frederick B. Doten of Company F, 14th CT Infantry, to his girlfriend Georgie Welles, from the headquarters of the 14th CT Volunteers. Doten writes that he has been feeling depressed and unwell. He was left behind when his regiment went off on reconnaissance. Doten writes of his love for the 14th Connecticut Volunteers, although this does not extend to the new conscripts. He then describes the band that plays each night at the headquarters for their entertainment, though they seldom have time for singing.


-Page 1-

Head Qrs.  14th Conn. Vols. 

                               Sept. 1st, 1863

Dear Miss Georgie

     In my present state of mind I don’t know that I should attempt to write to you. I am terribly blue. I have been quite unwell for a few days past, and unable to continue my duties. And yesterday morning I was obliged to see my regiment go off on a reconnaissance without me; the first time since I have been out, that I have been left behind. The camp is so very lonely. Do you wonder that I have the blues? I never thought that I should become so attached as I am to the 14th. My love though is for the old 14th, not

-Page 2-

the “conscripts” that have been put in with us. We certainly need filling up, for we have but a small regt.; only eighty-three privates on duty & three or four officers. But that little number has shared together the hard fortune of the 14th, and we do not welcome drafted men very lovingly.

     I feel very much pleased at the interest you express for my welfare. I can not thank you enough. My old headaches seldom trouble me, or have not until lately. As you say, I have been very fortunate to escape as I have from everything

     Have you made that trip to Mt. Holyoke yet? I wish very much I could join you. You remember we talked of that

-Page 3-

when I saw you last. When I go north, you may [be] sure that I shall go to see you, with many thanks for the invitation.

     I have heard that song, “Weeping Sad and Lonely.” Our band plays it beautifully. We have them play at Hd. Qrs. every night when we can. We have a splendid band, acknowledged by all to the best in the Army of the Potomac. As to our singing, we do not have much time for that. Besides our singers are all gone.

     I take the liberty of enclosing another picture. It may [be] better than the others. If so, please destroy them and keep this. I don’t want to intrude these things, but I am very anxious that you should have the best.

     I presume Mr. Harlon is and old married man before this. I don’t

-Page 4-

know it, only suppose it. I can’t induce him to write to me unless I write too. Strange, is it not? Does he show a proper and independent spirit? Or is he very obstinate?

     Have you decided to take that trip to Niagara with Mr. & Mrs. Stearns? Perhaps you are already on your way. If so, I wish you a very pleasant time, and a safe return. Please give them my very kind regards.

     You speak of tiring me with your letters. Don’t let such an idea enter your head again. Why, my dear Miss Georgie your letters are treasures. Please send me another soon.

     Please accept my regards for yourself,

                          Very truly yours,

                             Fred B. Doten


Frederick B. Doten, was born in Sheffield, MA in 1840. He worked as a clerk in New York City then enlisted at age 22 as a corporal in Co. A, 14th CT Infantry, August 1, 1862. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant of Co. F, March 3, 1863, adjutant of the regiment, April 14, 1863, and captain of Co. F, Oct. 20, 1863. He was present at “Pickett’s Charge” at Gettysburg, helping defend the Angle on July 3rd and was cited for receiving many captured swords from surrendering C.S. officers. He was captured at Morton’s Ford, VA on February 6, 1864, but after being imprisoned at Libby Prison, was exchanged and returned to duty as a staff officer for Brigadier General William Hays. He was mustered out May 1, 1865, and became a cashier of the 1st National Bank of Chicopee, MA. He married Georgie L. Welles in 1866, and died Apr. 9, 1903.

Another 3 of Doten’s letters to Georgie, dating from 19 June 1864, 13 October 1864, and 10 April 1865, can be found at Spared Shared. An inquiry into his Prisoner of War status in February, 1864 is available in Ohio State University’s records Be sure to check them out as well!

Letter – Jesse Brock, 4 August 1862

2015.002.036

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Assistant Surgeon Jesse W. Brock of the 66th OH Infantry, to his siblings, from a camp near Washington Court House in Rappahannock County, VA. He describes the apprehension before facing Stonewall Jackson at the Battle of Cedar Mountain. He is unsure of how long they will remain in their current camp, though he expects a battle soon. Jackson is in Gordonsville and Brock expects his regiment will have to meet him before long. He expects that the impending battle will decide the fate of George B. McClellan’s army. Brock expresses the need for more men, and hopes that they will volunteer rather than be drafted. He also writes that the army has lost its “novelty,” and that he has made it “a business now.”


-Page 1-

Camp Near Washington Court House

                   Rappahannock Co., Va.

August 4, 1862

Dear Brother & Sister

I don’t know whether I wrote you the last letter or not. Perhaps not as I am always indebted to everybody in some manner – therefore [I] always feel safe in writing. I am in good health; never had better health in my life. I received a letter from Jim Packer giving me the general news of Flushing & vicinity. I am always glad to   hear from any old home, as I am interested in that direction. I wish you all would write more frequent as I am so situated that I can always

-Page 2-

write when I would wish to. We are in camp; have been since the 1st instant. don’t know how long we may remain here; not so long I presume as we are expecting a battle near this point soon. [Stonewall] Jackson is at Gordonsville with a large force. We will have to meet him & with what success future history alone will tell. We were encamped at Alexandria for about 3 weeks were ordered to Sperrysville, 6 miles from here. We are under Pope’s command. He has 134 regiments in the field. Formerly we were with the 3rd brigade, Gen. Tyler commanding. Yesterday we were ordered to report at Washington for the purpose of organizing another brigade. We are under the command of Gen. Geary, formerly

-Page 3-

Governor of Kansas. We didn’t like the change much, knowing that Tyler was a fighting man. I hope we may find the same kind of a man in Gen. Geary. The weather is very hot here; almost insufferable. But we have to stand it. We are anxious to have the present battle decided as it in a manner decides the fate of McClellan’s army. There is an uneasy sensation manifested in our troops concerning McClellan’s army. We need your 300,000 men immediately hope you will send them along, and that without drafting. I presume you will hate to part with your sons. But recollect others have sacrificed & you will become compelled to do the same. Let your

-Page 4-

young men pitch in & show their grit. Nothing like it when you once get used to it. The thing has lost its novelty to me. I make it a business now. My mate leaves me the 15th of this month; don’t know whether he will return or not. If possible I want you to meet me at Waightstown sometime in October. Perhaps I am too fast, but I shall try & come home for a few days. Don’t allow yourselves to be drafted, but show your hand & volunteer. This rebellion must be put down. I would like to hear from you soon. Tell me all about your affairs. How is George & that sweet little child. Tell him to send me her photograph. My love to your family & all my relatives & tell friends write soon.

                                  Your brother J.W. Brock

                                       

-Page 1, Crosswritten-

address

J.W. Brock,

Asst. Surgeon 66th Regt. O.V.I.

Gen. Geary’s Brigade,

via Washington


Jesse W. Brock was mustered in as assistant surgeon on November 5, 1861. He was promoted to surgeon September 13, 1862, and was mustered out July 15, 1865. At Cedar Mountain, VA, August 9, 1862 the 66th OH lost 10 enlisted men killed, 4 officers and 77 enlisted men wounded, and 3 men captured, a total of 94 casualties from a an effective strength of about 250.

Letter – Cecil Fogg, 31 January 1864

2015.002.016h

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter of Private Cecil Fogg of Company B, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, to his father from Chattanooga, TN. Fogg writes that sutlers have come to camp, and retracts his previous request for money. He describes a scouting trip to McLenmore Cove where they rescued families of Union Home Guards who had been taken prisoner. Fogg writes that a cavalry expedition to Dalton found no Confederate troops, and that his regiment is still working on a bridge. The 92nd Ohio is working on burying deceased soldiers in the nearby National Cemetery, while other squads are fencing in the depot and repairing the railroad track to Knoxville. Fogg mentions family friends who have re-enlisted in the 40th Ohio, and were at Shell Mound since the fight at Lookout Mountain but are now guarding the railroad. Veterans from the 36th Ohio have begun to return home. Several deserters have been sentenced in a court martial. Fogg discusses the benefits of instating a draft and concludes by mentioning the recent arrival of sanitary stores.


-Page 1-

Chattanooga, Tenn. Jan. 31/64

Father

     I have rec’d 3 or 4 letters from you within the last 10 days; 2 of them containing thread. There was enough in the first one to do me, as the sutlers have now come up. I wrote to you on the 17th for some money. If you have not sent any, you need not now, for I can get along without it till we are paid again. I believe I have not wrote to you since the scout. We were out on a 3 days’ scout to McLenmore Cove. We started out on the 18th and went up to where we came down the mountain in Sept. We camped there at the foot of the mountain on the night of the 18th, and the next day we went a few miles farther and loaded up about 16 or 18 wagons

-Page 2-

with some Union families and their household goods, and came back to the place where we camped the night before. We camped there that night and returned to our camp at Chattanooga the next day. The families which we moved in are families of Union Home Guards, who have been taken prisoners by the Rebs. The Home Guards met to organize and elect officers, and the Rebs slipped in on them in our uniform, and took all but 5 or 6 of them. They shot some of them in the own door yard, stripped some of all their clothing, and made them double quick towards Dalton in their bare feet over the frozen ground. It rained the morning we started out there, and the road was very bad that day. But it froze up that night, and snowed a little.

-Page 3-

It thawed a little the next day, and froze up again at night, so we had pretty good walking back to camp. I understand that our cavalry have been out to Dalton and found no enemy there. Our regt. is still at work on the bridge. The 92nd [Ohio] is engaged at the work of re-interring the bodies of soldiers who have been killed or died, and been buried near this place.

They are burying them in the National Cemetery near this place. There are also squads at work fencing in the depot, and repairing the track between here and Knoxville. And I think the [rail]cars will be running through to that point in a short time. This is a very lively place at present; nearly everybody appears to be doing something. I saw John Williams’ boys a few

-Page 4-

days ago. They are in the 40th Ohio. Their division passed up the river. They have been at Shell Mound since the fight at Lookout Mt. They have all three re-enlisted, and expect to go home in a short time. They are going up to guard R[ail] Road between here and Knoxville for the present. The veterans of the 36th (about 54 in number) started home a few days ago. Harrison Adney is one of them. None of the Salem boys in this regt. have re-enlisted yet. I believe Henry Pedin started home a few days ago on furlough. We have had about 2 weeks of the finest weather I ever saw at this time of the year. It realizes my former ideas of the “Sunny South,” but which all were put to flight by that cold snap in the fore part of the month.

-Page 5-

The deserters are catching it pretty hard at the court martial now in session. Three deserters in Co. B were tried a few days ago. They don’t know their sentence yet. Bill McKey is sentenced to one month’s hard labor, and lose 10 month’s wages. His sentence is light. Some have to work 6 months, lose a year’s pay, and after they have worked out their sentence, return to the regt. and make up for all the time they have lost. All your arguments in favor of big bounties for volunteers look to me as though they might be used as arguments on the other side. If the novelty of the thing has worn off and volunteering is a drag, why not draft at once save time and money, and bring out some of the Copperheads into the ranks who never will be there unless they are drafted, or get more than their services

-Page 6-

are worth in the shape of a bounty. If the draft had come off 6 months ago, there would not have been so many loafing soldiers at home pretending to recruit for months at a time when their services are needed in the field. I think the veterans ought to have twice the bounty that a raw recruit gets, for a veteran is worth more to the gov’t than 2 new recruits. Almost every regt. in the service lost more than half their no. before they ever done any service to the government. A regt. will lose one half its no. in getting seasoned to the service.

     Some sanitary stores have reached this place, and the sick and wounded in the hospitals in town have had the benefit of some of them. And the hospital attendants and officers are living in closer. They can afford to be generous when they have more than they can use themselves.

                                   Cecil Fogg


Cecil Fogg enlisted in Company B of the 36th OH Volunteer Infantry on August 12, 1861 at Marietta, OH at the age of 20. He served through his three year term of service and re-enlisted for the war, but was mustered out July 27, 1865 based upon a surgeon’s certificate of disability. The 36th served in West Virginia in 1861, and participated in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam as a part of the 9th Corps before being transferred west in January 1863. As a part of the Army of the Cumberland’s 14th Army Corps (George H. Thomas), the regiment fought at Chickamauga and later in the Atlanta and Savannah, GA (March to the Sea) Campaigns.