Letter – Hiram Young, 15 August 1864

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Letter written by Private Hiram H. Young of Company B, 88th IN Volunteer Infantry. Young writes that Confederate troops unsuccessfully tried to drive in the Union skirmishers the day before, near Atlanta. He mentions that the Potomac Army calls the Confederates Johnny Rebs, while the Cumberland Army calls them Peter Butternuts. He comments on the hot weather, and mentions how the troops are in good spirits and participating in leisure activities. He ends by apologizing for the dirty letter, as “sow belly is plenty and soap is scarce.”


-Page 1-

August 15th 1864

The mail did not go out yester day and this morning Thought to tell you what took Place yester after I Quit Writing Just Before sundown the Rebs tried to Drive in Our skirmishers This Raised Considerable of a mess But nary Drive way there to our skirmishers they held them Ground and was Determined To fight – Like a fierce Bull Pug Rather than fall Back there was 4 Johnny come in Yester day I dont no as you will under stand By the name of Johnnys the Potomac Boys calls them Johnny Rebs and the Cumberland Boys calls them Peter Butter nut It is very warm

-Page 2-

It is hot Enough to Bake ahoe cake in the sand at any Time The Boys are all in good spirits this morning some are Playing Cards others are singing some Playing marbel others are Reading there Bibels some cussing some swearing there is Enough going on to make it Interesting all around I will close Henry Winebrenner Come to The Reg This morning he is about well I expect I have written more than you care about Reading

as Ever Yours

Hiram

PS Excuse all mistakes Dirt and Greese as Sow Belly is Plenty and soap is scarce


Hiram H. Young, from Wolf Lake, IN, enlisted with his friend, Henry C. Winebrenner (mentioned in the text) in Company B of the 88th IN Volunteer Infantry on July 26, 1862. Both survived the war and were mustered out at Washington, D.C. on June 7, 1865. Hiram was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 1, 1865, but was not mustered.