Letter – John Compton, 24 September 1863

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Letter written by Private John D. Compton of Company G, 105th OH Volunteer Infantry, to his sister Margaret, from a camp near Chattanooga, TN. Compton describes a “hard fight” that occurred the previous week [Battle of Chickamauga]. He writes that they were outnumbered and suffered many casualties but only one man from his company was wounded. The regiment was forced to retreat on the last day of the fight. His company was then held in reserve.He describes an order to “charge bayonets” which drove back one brigade of Confederate troops. Compton sends his regards to his other family members, and urges his sister to reply soon.


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Camp near Chatinuga Tenn Sep 24/63

Dear sister Margret I recevid your [???] letter and was glad to hear from you since I got your letter We have had some hard times We have ben in a very hard fight last friday saturday, and Sunday We fought the enimy with Superior number our loss was grate While the enimy was grater from our Compiney there was none Killed but one wounded that was Cussion the red hed that ust to go Kingsville to School the ordly sargen and my self took him from the field our regt on saturday was obliged to retreet our ranks was broken by the surpier number but the brigade was scatered to the 7 winds of the Earth but our small squad containing 425 men was scatered could not get the next but 126 men in our reg We then held in resirve so if our ranks broke we could sustain them the rebels broke our ranks on sunday the men ran We layed about 6 rods back of them they ran thru ours the order was given to charge bayonets We done it and drove one brigade of them they flanked us we ran back We expect another atact but let them come We are very heavy fortifying here Waiting for [???] then we will try them Well I must stop riting for this time J.D. [???] is all rite and all the rest I will tell you the rest next leter rite soone from your Brother give my love to all Father mother sister brother rite soone let our fokes no how I am as soone as you get this

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Well James rite to me

Good Bye Forever J.D.

Compton to Margret and James [???] rite soone as you get this


John D. Compton was the son of farmers Rueben and Margaret Cary Compton. He was born in New York in 1842. Sometime between 1850 and 1860 the family moved west and settled in Kingsville, Ashtabula County in Ohio. He was killed on July 22, 1864 during the battle of Atlanta from a gun shot wound to the abdomen.

Letter – John Compton, 10 June 1863

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Letter written by Private John D. Compton of Company G, 105th OH Volunteer Infantry, to his father, from a camp near Murfreesboro. Compton writes that he has sent for a record of Company G that will list who belonged to the regiment, who died, where they marched, and give the personal information of the men. He mentions that he was exchanged after being captured by the Confederates, and that he will send home his parole and paper of clearance given to him by General William Rosecrans.


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ths 10/63

Camp Near Murfreeboro Tenn [???]

Dear father I thought I would rite a few lines to you this morning to let you no how I am I am well at presant and hope these few line will find you the same I have sent for a record of the Co G 105 Ohio Reg to tell Who did belong and who died and whare and the marches and all the fight and camp and age of the boys and all about it then when I get this I will send it home to you and you get a case and put it in and keep it I am exchanged and I will send my Parole home and the paper of clearance which rosincrance gave me and I want you to keep

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it and all the rest I send home to you keep them safe till I come home the boys is all well at presant rite some to me and tell me if you get this good morning from J.D. Compton

to his father and mother R-S Compton and Margaret Compton in Kingsville Ashtabula Co Ohio

rite and tell me if you got my other Parole I sent it to H. Brooks


John D. Compton was the son of farmers Rueben and Margaret Cary Compton. He was born in New York in 1842. Sometime between 1850 and 1860 the family moved west and settled in Kingsville, Ashtabula County in Ohio. He was killed on July 22, 1864 during the battle of Atlanta from a gun shot wound to the abdomen.

Letter – John Compton, 19 February 1863

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Letter written by Private John D. Compton of Company G, 105th OH Volunteer Infantry, to his siblings, from a camp near Murfreesboro. Compton describes how he was taken prisoner while foraging . He is back in camp after being paroled and describes his experience as a prisoner of the Confederates for three days. Compton says they were mistreated by provost guards. He attempted to leave the parole camp to visit his comrades in the 105th, but the guards found out. Compton writes disparagingly of the Union officers he was captured with. He suggests that his brother stay out of the army. Despite the tone of his letter Compton insists he is not homesick, and does not want his parents to worry about him.


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Camp Near murphysbrough

Feb 19 1863

Dear brother and sister as I have some Time I will rite a few lines to you to let you no that I am well at presant and hope these few lines will find you the same Well Jim I thought I would rite and give you a decription of how I was taken I had ben with the Reg 9 1/2 days they sent us out ot forage some stuff for the need to eat on the 21 of Jan got a bout 6 1/2 miles from camp when the Reb began to fire in our front We got one of our wagons and loded our guns and some of the boys fired into them the oficers was taken captin Canfield and lieutenant Torgee 3 otherSeth Perker and my Self Was all that Was taken before that you new but [???] Renginan Was taken We are all here in camp the oficers I supose will put us in the ranks but if they do for the [???] is broken they say but that is nothing to do with us they must be careful how they get in a fight with me for I think I am very good shot with the gun they give me Some of the boys has got home and When We get Paid off I Will leve too I think I have my PP [Provisional Parole] in my pocket Well Jim I will tell you how we lived while the Reb had us We stayed in a cart House We lived on corn

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bread and bisket with some sow bekon [bacon] the bread no salt in it but they had none neither so I could stand it they kept us 3 days then give us our P.P. and took us out of their lines and set us out for our selves We Went to Munfordsville Ky got on the cars and started for Lusville Went thus 3 days in [???] then Went to Nashville Tenn Kep 2 1/2 days then went to murphysborough stoped 2 days I ran away and went to see the boys and back every night they found out that We Were found to [???] they said that We might go out to camp so rather than to lay in fall we went the gard said that they was glad to get red of us they said dam the 105 all Hell could not Keep some of them and I was one of them you can [reckon] but Jim I said I would tell you What i had to eat we had flour from the time they Paroled us till we got out of their lines we mixed it up on a Plate and backed it on a ford with out any salt or shortning it Was flour and water that we got from a inn by the side of the rode they treeted us as well as they used their own men but we did not get enough of that When we got a mong the Dam northern sholder straps Jim if I live till the War is over their will be some of the Straps Ketch Hell I think one has got his just do Torgee is a mong the Reb and god noes I hope he will stay their till the War is over

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Jim you no what he rote Home a bout me When Was taken before he rote Home that I and Seth Parker was Drunk I hope they Will Keep him till he can learn to tell the truth and I guess they Will Jim I am a single man and can stand it but it is Well for you did not inlist When I did and I will give you some good advice you ar out and do you keep out the boys has gone out expecting a fight before they get back I should have had to go if it had not have ben that they did not no whether they had a rite to ask us or not I expect every day When they Will if they do old Hall will get the first charge from my gun if he goes in front dont tell or sho this to every one for it might get out you no and it might go hard with me but I Will do as I say if I get a good chance for I should have ben home now if it had not ben for him and I [always] Pay my Debts I gess he will get his Pay for the Boys all owes the same debt I gess some of them will Pay the debt Well Jim you may think that I am Home sick for the Way I rite but I am not but it makes me mad to think how they Will beg a fellow to get Him Draft once is a nough I think tell our fokes not to fret for I will come out all rite tell Pa to send

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get my clothes at Columbus if he sent them When I last herd from Home Pa Was Sick I hope he may get well tell him not to fret a bout me for I am well and tuff rite to John D. Compton Co G 105 2 Brigade 5 Division Murphysburough Tenn

Care of Captin Crowell

tell Pa to send me some stamps so I can by some Paper


John D. Compton was the son of farmers Rueben and Margaret Cary Compton. He was born in New York in 1842. Sometime between 1850 and 1860 the family moved west and settled in Kingsville, Ashtabula County in Ohio. He was killed on July 22, 1864 during the battle of Atlanta from a gun shot wound to the abdomen.