Letter – William Wall, 11 July 1864

2015.002.163

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Letter written by Surgeon William B. Wall of the 33rd MS Infantry, to his wife, from Atlanta, GA. Wall begins by reporting the deaths of several of his comrades followed by the well-being of several of their acquaintances and family members. He remarks on the high price of goods in the area, and hopes that his family is getting enough to eat, though if they aren’t he is unsure of where they could get more money. Despite the low pay and rations, Wall remarks that the army is still in good spirits. They believe Confederate General Joe Johnston will whip Union General William T. Sherman. He writes that all the men are “getting miserably tired of the long siege.” Wall remarks that he loves his country, but he loves his wife and children more. He is afraid if the Union wins, their lands and homes will be taken away and given to strangers.


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Atlanta Ga July 11th 1864

My Dear Wife

I have not written You now for several days. There has not been any news to write. Thos M Murphy and A J Turpin each members of Comp “I” 33rd Miss were killed on the 4th July A G Beal & M M Gist Comp “I” have died at Hospt: from wounds recvd May 31st. I was at the Regt this morning, every thing perfectly quiet I dont know precisely where the enemy is or where or when he will make his next demonstration. Lt Brown is well & was well pleased as he had just gotten a long letter from his wife Our command is in much better health than it was a few weeks ago All of your acquaintance are well I will inform you of every one who may be so unfortunate as to be killed or wounded. I have not seen Pryor yet & will probably not until this campaign is over. I wrote you that I had gotten a note from him in reply to mine that he was well. I shall inquire after him & if he is hurt let you know. You cant tell how anxious I get to hear from you, but I am not disposed to complain, for I fell certain it is the fault of the mails & not yours – the last letter I had from

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you was written the 13th & 15th June nearly a month ago at that time the most of you were more or less sick, Mary had just been taken down worse – I would like to know how she had gotten. I advise you to take her to Grenada if she didnt improve as you proposed to do. If she is not well or nearly so, by the time you get this you had better take her to Hughs – I am always anxious for your health could I feel satisfied that you were well many an unhappy moment would be escaped. My health is most excellent. Visit Aunt Nan & Give her my kindest regards – write me how her health is getting – Henry Johnson has heard from Cousin Addie through a Mr Allen just from there, he will write to her or rather has written. I could not see the gentleman, he is a disabled soldier. the family were all well, heard nothing from Sallie – Had a letter from Col Johnson a few days ago, his family were all well. Said Aunt Laura was always uneasy about Henry, her health better than it used to be every thing is high here we pay $2.50 pound for bacon at the commissaries – for Mutton in the country from $2.00 to 2.50 pound – Irish potatoes $20.00 to $25.00 bushel other articles in the same ratio – I hope you will make enough to eat & wear at home; if you don’t I can’t see where

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you will get money to buy with – The government pays eighty cents pound for beef – Officers are issued one ration you know for which they are not charged but that is not enough for him & a negro & then we are compelled to have some vegetables occasionally & they are so miserably high it takes a large portion of our pay to keep up. The army is still in good spirits, the men think that Gen Johnston will fight Sherman after a while & that he will whip him whenever he does, & so do I – we are all getting miserably tired of the long siege (as it may be called) though entirely willing to let Gen Johnston say when I expect to see you sometime during the Summer the time looks long, but we must be patient. Give my love to Mrs Oliver. Is Miss Bettie in good health now? Kind regards to all acquaintances. Much love to Laura & Mamie kiss them for me. did they get the little letters I sent them? Howdy & Respects to the Servants, tell them I wish them all well. Tell Same & Henry they must let me hear from their crop & stock – I think this will be the last year of the war & I know you hope it may be – Our Separation seems to me almost like a little life time. I sigh & long for the times to come when we may again be permited to live together again. I feel bound to do my country service as long as it is invaded by a relentless foe & your health & condition will permit. I love my country

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though I love you & my children more. You must try & be reconciled at our separation. Our enemys -at least some of them- are even now proposing to dispossess us of all we have & give our homes & lands to strangers – This of course can never be done. Well I have just finished my supper. it was first rate. I had corn bread, bacon, irish potatoes, ocre [okra] & irish potato soup& genuine coffee I think I hear you laugh at the idea of soup for supper – you may laugh if you like, it was good any how – we have a way of our own in the army so far as cooking wha tlittle we have – the army is getting plenty of meat & bread We had a nice rain yesterday. the weather is pretty warm – We have just gotten this news from Va, which we regard as pretty good – Love & a thousand kisses to the children – I will stop for the present Remember me in all your prayers – Your ever devoted husband.

W B Wall

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 23 July 1864

2015.002.151

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Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis, from Gainesville, AL.¬†Jackson writes of a shopping trip to Memphis that Lucy’s mother has planned. He informs Lucy that her father is heading to Linden via Livingston, and that her mother is planning another trip to Lauderdale. Thomas writes that he misses Lucy, and mentions that he has had trouble sleeping at night. To stave off a potential illness, he plans on taking a good amount of medicine that day.


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Office, July 23/64

My Darling,

I did not intend writing you today, but yr mother desired me to inform sister, that she disapproved of the purchase of Miss Mar Lou’s dyed silk, and to apprize you, That Miss Thornton & Mr Dobb purpose setting out for Memphis on Monday week. 2nd of Augt. She intends sending by Mr Dobb for a black silk dress for Sister, & thought you & she would like to be at home before they start, so as to

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make up a memorandum of such articles as you would like him to get for you – If this suggestion comports with your wishes, advise me of it, & I will arrange to arrive at Mr Minge’s on Friday the 29th inst. so that you may reach home on the Sunday following. If otherwise, you need not expect me at Farmsdale until Tuesday the 2 of Augt. Your mother desires me to say, also, that she has written to you, & forwarded a letter to Miss Kittie, 7 two to you,

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& begs Miss Kittie not to think it strange if hers has the appearance of having been opened – She tore the old envelope so, in her efforts to erase the original address, that she was compeled to employ a new one.

Yr Father started to Livingston this morning, en route to Linden, & yr Mother is preparing to carry out her proposed excursion to Lauderdale –

I miss you every hour in the day – Could not sleep last night until two o’clock – Do not know the cause of my

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unusual restlessness – Hope it is not a forerunner of an attack of sickness – Shall, nevertheless fortify myself against such an unwelcome contingency, by taking a good dose of medicine tonight – I pulled a peach to day – it is beautiful & fragrant – & although it will not keep for you to enjoy it, I have put it in yr wardrobe & shall, at least, have the satisfaction of calling it yours for a few days. My tenderness for you, dear Lucy, is unabated – You possess the entire devotion of my heart, & are the only woman to whom the offering was ever made. Oh! my

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precious wife – I cannot exist without your love which I prize above all earthly blessings Let us never withhold our confidence from each other

yr fond Husband

TKJ

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Love to my dear Miss Mar. Lou. to Sister & all at Mr Minge’s


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 20 July 1864

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Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis from Gainesville, AL. Thomas writes that he had a pleasant journey home, and describes the recent weather conditions. He mentions seeing a few army friends in Demopolis and took tea at General Stephen D. Lee’s headquarters, although he did not see the general himself. He mentions meeting the brother in law of General James Longstreet, Colonel George Deas. Thomas updates his wife on her family and friends, including preparations by Lucy’s mother for a grand supper for the soldiers. General Robert E. Lee approved the resignation of Dr. McIvor, whose “services. . . have gone up-to the Confederacy.”


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Office. July 20 1864.

My Darling,

I had an agreeable & quick passage home – The weather was fine, being quite a contrast to that we experienced going down –

Saw Major Butler & Capt Carpenter in Demopolis – they desired to be remembered to you – Butler said he was very sorry that we passed thro’ town without his knowledge, & hopes to have the pleasure of seeing you all during your visit in the “Canebrake.” I took tea at Gen’l Lee’s Hdqrs, & passed a very pleasant night in Meridian – Did not see the Gen’l, but met with quite a number of friends & acquaintances, among them Colo. George Deas – Brother-in-law to General Longstreet – It seemed like old times to see so many familiar faces – & in Camp too. Capt. Williams is at last established in Meridian – He was not there himself – having gone to Selma to assist in pushing forward supplies to Johnston’s Army – but Lewis did the honors of his office – I called for yr fan at Lauderdale, & much to my surprise & satisfaction the clever old land lady produced it intact, though having some signs of service under the administration of greasy hands.

You cannot think how glad I was to recover

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it – not for its worth, but because you seemed to regret its loss. There was nobody at home when I arrived – Yr Mother & Mr Dobb were at the old hospital buildings preparing for the supper, which is to be given tomorrow night – & Miss Annie & Willie were spending the day at Dr Barret’s. I soon refreshed myself with a bath & clean clothes, & started to the hospital to see Yr Mother, but met her & Mr Dobb returning home

All are well at home, except Mary’s baby, which is, & has been very sick – The servants enquired very particularly after you, & seem anxious for yr return. Yr Father is well & in good spirits – He seems glad of my return, says it has been mighty lonesome – wanted to know why I did not bring you & Sis, & says you shan’t leave home any more. The storm that interfered with our comfort at Lauderdale was very violent here – the pontoon lumber down at the river, was scattered about in all directions, one plank striking a member of the guard (named Smith) so violently as to break his scull, & killing him instantly. The Hotel was not injured. tho’ a fair mark for its fury- I have had to write this note under many disadvantages, being constantly interrupted, which will explain its disconnected style. The Judge is going down to Linden next week – He starts on saturday & goes by way of Livingston

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& will probably be in Demopolis on Sunday – I will write to you further on the subject, so that if you contemplate spending a day with Mrs Pool, you may be able to make it convenient to see him in Demopolis as he passes through. He thinks that as he will be dependent upon friends for conveyance to Linden he will not be able to go to Mr Minge’s to see you all

Yr Mother says there will be no Ice cream at the supper – all of McMahon’s having either melted or been disposed of, & she thinks it too expensive to procure it from Columbus – Mrs Lacy, subscribed custard &c for the supper, but after reflection wrote a note to yr mother, to say, that she had done all she felt able to do for the soldiers at the supper “superintended by her (yr mother’s) sisters” & begged that her name might be erased from the list. Funny wasn’t it? – Yr Aunt Carrie says Mrs L had arranged this little episode beforehand, I have not told you half I have to say, but must wait until tomorrow to write more – I am too busy, & so flustered that I scarcely know what I write – I think of you constantly & am happier & better from the [???] – I regard our connexion as the most fortunate circumstance of my life – nothing could compensate me for yr love – You are my good angel, & however wayward I may be my love is

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all your own – I desire much love to Mr & Mrs Minge to dear Miss Mar Lou, & all the family, not forgetting Mrs & Miss Christian – the latter [???] Kathy – has in addition my wishes for the speedy recovery of her usual buoyant spirits – Tell her I saw her Mr Simpson in Meridian – he was looking well.

Sr. Mc Ivor – the son of a Baron, the Brother of a lord & marchioness – has resigned his commission in the Army – I saw him in Meridian – Genl Lee has approved his resignation & his “services,” as he expressed it, “have gone up to the Confederacy” – He has returned to this place to await further action on his resignation. I expect to express the palmetto to day – Yr Mother has not sent it down yet – I am waiting for it. I send much love to my dear little sister & hope she spent a pleasant time with her little friend – We have no Army news – Goodbye Darling

Entirely & most affectionately yrs.

TKJ


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Lucy Reavis, 3 February 1864

2015.002.145

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Letter written by Lucy Reavis Jackson to her husband, Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., dated February 3rd, 1864, from Gainesville, Alabama. Lucy praises Thomas for the elegant and romantic letters he sends her. She updates him on the health and overall well-being of her family, including the illness of her aging mother. Lucy mentions that many people have recently been married, and she hopes that they are as happy as she and Thomas.


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Home Feb. 3d 1864.

You are too good to me, my dear Darling- I have another letter to-day, written yesterday, for which accept many thanks – Your letters are perfect models, when I read them to Mar Lou, she wonders if all men write to their wives so sweetly – and says if she is not in love with you, she is with your delightful, affectionate letters – she has not learned yet, that my beloved one is different, superior to all other men – I must write fast, or my letter will not go this afternoon, Uncle John has already come up. Do you know I received two letters from you yesterday – In the morning one came dated the 31st, In the afternoon came another, the 25th Where had it been for a whole week? But though I had several of a later date, it was mighty sweet – It does me good to see soon your hand-writing.

I am afraid though Nannies’ “wanderings have ceased” you will not soon derive any benefit from the “contract”- She is going to school again – a great burlesque Ma thinks – In her spare hours she has to dress & visit, so has little time to devote to you – Now, you see, if you had given it to me, I should have taken the greatest pleasure in making the bag, and it would have been completed long ago. They all say, I am jealous of the least attention, shown you by others – that I want you all, myself. Am I – Can I be – so selfish? Mittie has not been to school this week – She is really a martyr to sore throat – Then too she is a little blue – Mar Lou and I had a delightful walk yesterday afternoon – met one of Mr Giles servants, who had come in to send a dispatch to Mr G. His mother is very ill – I am so sorry, the old lady is quite old & delicate & there are so few in the family, they cannot afford a single member – I hope sincerely she will recover- He was not at home when his

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father died – so now they always telegraph as soon as any one is sick. Dinner is ready – Well. the troublesome meal is over. You should see me presiding at the table, during Ma’s sickness – Quite matronly I look – Ma is better, improving every day. She is up and dressed – enjoying a bird, that Jimmie shot for her dinner – Do you like to hunt? Ma sends Jim ought every day to shoot her a bird – Here are a number of doves in the orchard. Capt Williams was at the wedding last night – They were married by a Catholic Priest & he says, he never heard a woman, made to promise so much The people are quite in the notion of marrying – All following our example – I hope they will all love each other as truly & be as happy as we are & always intend to be. Fannie Isbell is to marry a Mr Winston next Wednesday – He is a rich, young lawyer from Arkansas. She met with him New Years eve & the old tale – love at first sight – Didn’t they hurry yp matters? The Misses Sledge show great taste, in preferring you to their beaux – I know they regret not having met you sooner – I am glad you like them so well – Captain Williams goes to Columbus this evening. He will return some time next week, to settle up accounts – Ma & Sister both send much love & want to see you mighty bad – For myself – I cannot restrain my impatience – And every letter I get makes me love you better & desire more ardently to see you – Uncle John got the things you wanted – to make ink I suppose – but they all say Dr Park’s recipe is not good – they tried it & failed – Poor Captain [Haines?] died to-day – I am so sorry for his daughters – It was a shame in his wife to leave him nothing, when she died – Uncle John says he must go & I am at the end of my page, so will say no more – You have been so good, about writing to me – Do continue

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to do so – It is so easy for you to write nice letters & they give me so much joy – Goodbye my dear Major I shall count the days until I see you – Give me love to Kate & Edith & tell them not to go distracted about you –

Yours devotedly Lucy-


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 2 February 1864

2015.002.144

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Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis Jackson, from Macon, MS. Thomas gently chides his wife for feeling jealous of the attention he receives from some female friends, and reassures her of his love. He describes how he taught a few young ladies to make cigaritas, and that they asked several questions about Lucy and the couple’s courtship before they were married.


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Macon, Feby 2. 1864.

My Love,

I’ll have a race to finish this in time for today’s mail – but my love is strong and can accomplish much – I received your delightful letter yesterday –

I know you must have returned home Saturday – The whisperings of my love rarely deceive me – I am rejoiced to find you in such fine spirits, & ever so glad to know you are cheerful & happy –

Oh! I am so happy in my little wife – she’s the dearest, the sweetest, & the best in the world – How could you, my Love, imagine I intended a “cut at you”, about the gloves? I never dreamed such a thing –

Miss Edith was knitting a pair for Captain Longborough – said she was very fond of knitting – would like to knit gloves for all the soldiers, & would knit a pair for me if she could get the wool – I thought it mighty kind in her, & told you of it, as I tell you everything else – Ah you dear little sensitive thing! Your apprehension is too quick and does me injustice – Don’t you laugh at “Sis Susan’s” comments on your neglect to invite her to our wedding anymore –

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I called to see the young ladies last night according to promise, & proceeded to teach Miss Edith the art of rolling cigaritas – we soon converted the parlor into cigar shop, & were progressing finely when somebody knocked at the door – the girls seemed quite put out – Edith declared she wanted me all to herself, I had come to see her, & Kate must entertain the visitors – Kate vowed she wouldn’t – “Pink” was the oldest & must entertain them, she wanted to talk to Maj Jackson – it was quite amusing – I felt flattered of course – A married man like me preferred to young beaux – I stayed til after the departure of the young gentlemen, & enjoyed a delightful visit – The girls asked a thousand questions – wanted to know what I called you, & if I kissed you before we were married – I told them I called you Pidgeon, [???] &c – & asked Kate what she would think of a man she was engaged to, if he did not offer to kiss her before they were married – she said she’d “kiss him” – Edith said she “wouldn’t” – When Kate remarked, but “Pink you have kissed somebody” – Of course Pink denied the charge – Tell my sweet little sister, that what I have to tell her is of no consequence – she must not be impudent – I would not repay the most ordinary cu-

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riosity – Tell Uncle John to let you keep my shoes until I come which I hope will be in 7 or 8- Give my love to all including Miss Katie & your gentle friend & believe me as ever your fond & loving husband

TKJ


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Lucy Reavis, 1 February 1864

2015.002.143

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Letter written by Lucy Reavis Jackson to her husband, Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., from Gainesville, AL. Lucy updates Thomas on her family, and recounts their night filled with piano music and games. She mentions seeing the commander of the post, Captain Guibor, at church, and writes about the arrival of the Quartermaster, Captain Thornton. Lucy mentions several upcoming weddings. She describes the fine weather, and how her mother has been gardening. She also writes of how her brother brought “the itch” (likely epidemic scabies) with him when he returned from Virginia. Lucy is somewhat envious of a friend of hers who is travelling to Macon soon, though she expects her friend will get lonely on the trip.


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Gainesville February 1st 1864 –

Do you remember the old saying dear Major, that we are apt to do often in the month what we do the first day? I have begun bravely you see – writing to you on this first day – Again I have left the parlor for this purpose – Captain Williams & Pa were playing Euchre, with uncle John & Mar Lou as opponents. I hear Nannie laughing at some of Mr Dobb’s witticisms – They seem to be very friendly to-night, rested on the sofa together [???] sits at the piano & I hear her now singing “here’s a heart for any fate” – Poor Ma is in bed & I am sitting near her writing to him I love, above all things – If you were only here this morning – Do you know, Sunday morning I could not help watching the cars, thinking you might possibly come – Mar Lou has decided to go down on the boat Friday week – I said I would rather you would not make us another visit until after her departure, but I cannot wait so long, do come this week if you can. I am so anxious to see you. Mrs Beauchamp was here this morning, told me I’d better write to you by the servant who goes up to-morrow – his wife is over at her house – She told me they asked him if he knew you & he said yes, that you were coming down the latter part of this week, if your wife got home – and she is at home & wants to see you dreadfully – I wonder if you think as often & fondly of me, as I do of you – The Commander of the Post was at Church, with uncle John, Sunday. He is quite gray and has a wife and family in Missouri – He is Dutch, or something, Capt Guibor – The Quarter-Master, Capt Thornton entered on his duties to-day, his daughter has been acting as his clerk & is the only one her brought with him – The Captain says he told him, he had a number of horses in Greene – & his daughters could not attend to them, “Well,” the old gentleman said, he “must try to get somebody” – then – “said the Captain some one must receive the tythe of corn, fodder &c – & yr daughter can

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not see to that” The old fellow became quite perplexed & thought he must hunt up some other clerk to attend to that – They board at Mr Bradshaw’s – The daughter was at church, seems to be quite a nice young lady, about my age – but there is a very rude son – We met him this afternoon & thought he would never tire of staring at us – He will not remain long I believe – You see, they are taking all of our young men away & putting these old, married men here, I regret it so much. Am afraid my friends will have a dull time when they come to see me. The ex Commander – Col McFarland – I understand is to be married shortly & Miss Lizzie B- is going to the wedding – That reminds me that there are to be two marriages near town to-morrow – Miss [???], a refugee is to marry Mr Luckett another refugee, both from Miss. and the other – guess who the bride-groom is______ Old Mr Holloway to Miss Horn, a young girl – She must be marrying to have some one to provide for her – Pa says he met him last week, returning from Livingston with his license, and his face looked like a full moon in Indian Summer, just as round and red. Ma has just roused up sufficiently to send you a long message – First, her best love & she was delighted with your letter, because it is so sweet & affectionate – Every thing in it is charming, save the allusion to taking me to Macon. that she thinks dreadful & almost worse than she can stand – She is much better to-day tho’ still in bed – says she took advantage of the fine weather & planted a number of Irish potatoes, peas &c – She had a nice time until she was attacked by her old enemy the [???] looking after the destruction Mr Chapman left behind him, at Cedar Bluff – Don’t that sound like her? She wants me to go on and tell you about the fences being down – how many young calves & pigs were there &c – but I shant do it – She was delighted with one thing she saw – a sheep with three little lambs – I wish they all had

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as many – If the war goes on, we would have a plenty of wool.

Your old friend Mrs Anderson was at the Chapel, Sunday afternoon – She goes to her own Church in the morning & down there in the evening – looks quite sad & badly – Mar Lou & I went to the poor Drs grave this evening – Judge Pierce asked me, if the body had been buried thought Mrs A- would have let him know, so that he might attend-

We are all in a peck of trouble now – Did you know that Reavis had the itch when he came home from Virginia? Isn’t it horrid? I hate to mention it- Well, he has gotten well – but Mammy Lucinda comes up today & shows Ma her arms, just covered with it – & she has been dressing Willie & waiting on Ma all the time – We are in fear & trembling that Will will have it & then of course all of us will – for he is such a little body, that he will make us fondle him – Wouldn’t it be dreadful? I had rather anything else almost – Ma was laughing to-day at the idea of Reavis’ going to see his sweet-heart in that condition – Mit has been shut up in her room all day, with dreadfully inflamed yes, which she caught from Reav – He always brings something bad with him, when he returns from his trips, so to-day as he was going to Mobile, we begged him not to return with the Small pox —- Mrs Beauchamp was very much pleased, when I told her you were having a fine time in Macon – She longs to be there herself and is going up in about two weeks. I shall envy her I expect but I feel mighty sorry for her, she must be so lonesome all day by herself – without any books to read or anything – If it were me – it would me no difference, for my pleasantest moments are those spent in thinking of my absent Darling – I wrote you quite a lengthy epistle Saturday night, which of course you have received before this – You will be surprised when this letter is given you I expect Captain Williams says he hopes will come down before

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he leaves – I think it will be the last of the week – Major Jackson I think Pa is so funny – He speaks of Captain Williams as though he were not particularly fond of him, but when he comes up, he seems to be delighted to see him & welcome him much more cordially than he ever did you. In fact he seems to look forward to his coming with something of Mitties pleasure – Aunt Mona sends much love to you so do all at uncle John’s – They are well, except aunt Callie –

Well my Dearest, I have talked on at a great rate – I have tired you with my nonsense, no doubt – but I love you so dearly, that my greatest pleasure is in writing, when I can not see you – Congratulate me – (or yourself) I have finished “the contract” the six pair of socks – am almost sorry, for it is very pleasant to have something to do for my dear one – Good-night – & pleasant dreams – Write soon to

Your love Wife-


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 27 January 1864

2015.002.141

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Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy, from Macon, MS. Thomas is unhappy at the prolonged separation from his new wife and inquires about her visit to Eutaw. He mentions a recent conversation with a local woman about securing a room for him and Lucy to board in. He also describes a party he attended the night before, and how they played plenty of games, although there was no music or dancing. Thomas remarks on the romantic lives of several of his friends and comrades, and mentions that “beaux are in demand.” He requests that Lucy send his love to her family, and writes that he hopes to see her within a few weeks.


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Macon, Jany 27, 1864.

My sweet wife,

I have just read over again your last two charming letters, and am all impatience to see you – Our wedded life has opened to me an unthought heaven., while this cruel separation deprives me of much of its happiness – Oh! I am too, too anxious to see you – To me, your voice is a delightful music – Your winning smile, an irresistible spell – If there is anything under the skies I worship, it is my honor – if there is anything dearer to me than that honor, it is your own sweet self –

My fond heart sends blessings to you upon every breeze, and I am entirely eternally yours.

Mr Hart came up from Mobile this morning – saw Reavis at the Junction, who told him you were to start to Eutaw today – I am glad you concluded to go – Miss Mar: Lou: deserves this attention from you, & will appreciate it – I hope you may enjoy your visit – You must tell me all about it, that I may share in your pleasure – I called upon Mrs Larnagin yesterday – Mrs Ferris

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was there – I soon made my business known – it was not unexpected – Kind Mrs Beauchamp had prepared the way – Mrs Larnagin has three gentlemen boarding with her – Would not mind taking others, if she could get anything to eat – She did not give me a positive or final answer – Mrs Ferris advocated our case warmly.

I told Mrs Larnagin we did not expect anything to eat – we were in love – and that I would call again before going to Gainesville – She seems a sweet gentlewoman, and willing to oblige us – only hesitates from want of confidence in her resources – La belle Fannie had he little party last night – We had cards, & games, syllabub & cake – no music no dancing – quite a pleasant little affair – I played the “agreeable” to Miss Pat Lyles, whom I found to be quite a sensible girl – She does not like her younger sister’s having married before her – is apprehensive the term “Old maid” will be applied to her prematurely – silly girl, in that, isn’t she? Miss Edith & miss Kate were present – They improve vastly – A little abrupt, or so – only habit – No letters from Charlie very recently – Had a long chat with the former – two of the Company, Doctors Brown & Rigg, are

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said to be in love with two others of the Company – the Misses Bush – One of the gentlemen affects the heroics, & tries to look consequential – the other attempts witticisms, but never gets beyond a species of waggery – The “Bushes” are thriving little shrubs, but require culture – altogether, the brace of couples seem very well matched, and appearances confirm the reports about them.

The young ladies here seem to think a girl very fortunate if her matrimonial prospects are visible – Beaux are in demand, & the advent of a single gentleman is forthwith telegraphed the length & breadth of the community – What do you think, all the girls want to know if any clerk were single – Ha ha! Old Jim Hart! Some of them asked me – You should have seen me presiding at dinner today – Half a dozen ladies at table – Capt Lucas absent – roast turkey to carve – I managed the turkey very well, but forgot the ladies names before I was ready to serve it – Called them all sorts of wrong names- my mistakes were ludicrous enough – La belle Fannie helped my out now & then – I was glad to amuse them however, even at the expense of my blushes – It was a delightful dinner party – we all laughed &

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enjoyed it vastly – I am vain enough to think I made an unusually favorable impression, notwithstanding my blunders, which, though numerous, I had sufficient skill & tact to turn to my advantage-

I have at last succeeded in getting the rooms I desired – they are delightful – I moved in yesterday – I’ve got Mr Hart in his shirt sleeves hard at work – Oh he will have such a delectable time fore the next two or three weeks – I shall be no better off – but sill always find time to write, if only a line, to my Darling, who is the bright queen of my thoughts – Do my letters reach you regularly? – I hope so – this is the fourth since I saw you. Give my love to your Mother – Tell her I remember her affection for me with pride & gratitude – I only wish I were more worthy of such goodness –

I send much love to your Father, and sweet sister, little Willie & all – I hope to be with you in the course of two or three weeks if not sooner – I shall work hard – At the bare thought of seeing you soon, my heart beats as if it had wings. Good bye my own sweet wife – fondly yours TKJ


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 25 January 1864

2015.002.140

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis Jackson, from Macon, MS. Thomas recently sent Mr. Hart to Mobile, so all of the office duties have fallen on his shoulders. He doesn’t mind the work, but would be happier if Lucy were with him. He is looking forward to returning home soon, and expresses his great love for his wife. “When will this cruel war cease,” writes Thomas, “that we may be with each other always!” He has a few social outings to attend in the coming week, and asks that Lucy extend his regards to family and friends.


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Macon, Jany 25, 1864

My precious Wife,

I have been as busy as a full hive of industrious bees in the blossom time – Only a little gallop, now & then, by way of recreation – I had to send Mr Hart to Mobile, & all the labors of the Office devolve on me – I don’t mind it though, for I like work when my duties are not perplexing, & would be perfectly happy if you were with me – I haven’t called upon Mrs Larnagin yet, but purpose doing so tomorrow – hope she will prove tractable – I am sure if she knew what a dear little thing you are, she would not hesitate a moment, and almost take us to board for nothing – Oh I shall be so happy when I can go home, sure of being welcomed by your smiling face – God bless you my own Darling – You are the pulse of my life – My love for you never wavers – It loves above all considerations except your happiness, which I pray for constantly –

Nothwithstanding all my occupations, the

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past week has dragged heavily along – I miss you so much, & wish for you continually – When will this cruel war cease, that we may be with each other always! Will you not be happy then? –

I have not been out since the party, but expect to attend several this week – I purpose calling upon the Misses Sledge this evening – This note will probably find you in Eutah – I hope you may enjoy your visit there – Be sure to give my love to all at Judge Pierce’s – You must bring Miss Mar Lou back with you – I wish so much to see her sweet face again before she returns home – At all events, assure her of my sincere attachment – & tell her to remember me with kindness to all at her house – I took a long walk last night – my thoughts were entirely of you – & I was happy in their indulgence – Oh! dearest you cannot know with what confidence, what fondness, what devotion I think of you – You are all the world to me, & I am entirely yours – If I write short letters, dearest, I will try to write them often – Believe in my love for it

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is entirely, eternally yours – When I reflect upon your goodness, yr virtues, your dear love, my heart expands & I love all the world – My love to all at home. May the perpetual smiles of Heaven be yours

yr fond husband

TKJ


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 21 January 1864

2015.002.139

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Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis Jackson in Gainesville, AL, from Macon, MS. Thomas writes that he intended to write to Lucy sooner, but was delayed as he had to send a load of beef to Atlanta [Major Jackson is in charge of the army’s supply of meat]. He mentions meeting the daughter of General Leonidas Polk. Thomas expresses how much he misses taking walks with Lucy back home, and writes about his great love for his wife. He inquires about family members, then describes a social outing he recently attended. Thomas retells how he was invited to escort a young lady to a party, but declined as he is a newly married man.


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Macon, Jany 21, 1864,

My own dear Wife,

I intended writing to you yesterday by Major Beauchamp, but early in the morning a dispatch came requiring me to send a thousand beeves to Atlanta immediately – consequently my time was fully occupied making the necessary arrangements until it was too late – besides I thought it likely you and Miss Mar Lou would have started to Eutaw before he got home, and my letter delayed several days anyhow – I took a ride yesterday evening – the weather was fine & the streets were all alive with the bright faces of many fair ladies, and troops of merry children – How delightful it must be for them to come out to breathe the fresh, invigorating air and enjoy the warm sunshine once more, after being housed up so long – I met a daughter of General Polk out walking – she has a fine face & is said to sing divinely – I am sure you hail with pleasure the return of fair weather, and will resume those delightful walks you enjoy so much – What a dear little indefatigable pedestrian you are! How I would like to be with you in your rambles! – I recur to our walks & talks as among the happiest moments of my life – Same how in your loved company my capacity for enjoyment seems increased ten-fold – Your dear presence developes new pleasures and beauties in every object – Nature smiles, and

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my heart bounds and it pounds in the fullness of love entirely yours – How idly that pretended philosopher talked when he asserted that “Absence conquers love” – What nonsense! Isn’t it? Love, having for its object those radiant virtues which belong to you, and whose value is enhanced by the purity of such a lovely character, cannot be conquered, and never, never dies – With me, absence from you, my Love, and association with others, only serve to show how incomparable you are, & to increase the intensity of my affection – It never occurs to me to wonder why I love you – It would be too absurd; when the answer is so evident to all who behold you – The only wonder is, what you ever saw in such a stupid fellow as me to love – while the single desire of my heart is to preserve yr affection, & make myself as worthy as may be, of such priceless love – Oh! I am so happy in the knowledge of your regard – The mail has just this moment brought me yr dear letter of yesterday – I thank you so truly for it – The gentle tenderness of my own precious wife sparkles in every word, and awakens new sentiments of love in my heart – I fear you were disappointed in not receiving a letter from me by Maj Beauchamp – do not think me negligent – I would not pain you for the world – I am grieved about Mattie – I love the dear child more than she can guess – I have felt much of what yr Uncle says, and have been much pained & perplexed by it – She’s a dear

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thoughtless child – be gentle with her – Let us hope nothing more serious than the “fun of the thing” – as she calls it – influences her conduct – even that is reprehensible enough Heaven knows – Young girls cannot be too circumspect – Trifles light as air, sometimes awakens eternal sources of regret – There was a party in town night before last, and another is to be to night – At dinner Miss Fannie Lucas said she would require an escort & would take me if I wished to go – but I am unacquainted with the parties, & told her, that since newly married men are generally considered very stupid on such occasion, I would prefer staying at home – She is a sweet little girl – says she will have a party soon & will bring me out. Isn’t she kind? The weather has been so unfavorable that I haven’t gone out any where as I intend to do – I’m afraid I shall not enjoy myself much however, as I can’t get up any enthusiasm unless you are present – I have deferred calling upon Mrs Larnagin (I don’t know how to spell her name) for the present, so as to allow the letter MRs Beauchamp promised to write, to have due weight before asking her to take us to board – Your dear society would be a great comfort to me, & I think you would enjoy a little visit here right well – but I fear you would sometimes be lonesome – I miss you constantly – tho’ never so much as when in

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company – When alone I can recalls the charms & grace of your society – the pretty expressions you use, and the gentle tenderness of your manner – and am happy as I ever can be, without you –

It is almost impossible for me to write a letter in the day time – I am interrupted so constantly – I must write at night here-after – I send much love to all at home & believe me dearest ever fondly

and affectionately your

proud & happy husband

Thos K Jackson


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Lucy Reavis, 8 January 1864

2015.002.138

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Letter written by Lucy Reavis Jackson to her new husband, Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A. Lucy is writing to Thomas even though he is expected to return home the next day. Captain Butler was supposed to visit, but was unable to come due to the frigid temperatures. Lucy updates Thomas on the state of her family members, and mentions the recent cold weather. She writes about how she recently made ice cream. Lucy is thrilled at her new title of Mrs. Jackson, though she worries that she will not see Thomas as much now that they are married as when they were engaged.


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Home. January 8th 1864

My Precious One

Mar Lou says it is foolish in me to write to you this afternoon, as you said in your letter that you’d be here the last of the week, and to-morrow is Saturday – but perhaps you will not be able to come & if you do, you will have this to entertain you to-night at the delectable Junction. Oh! I am so glad you are coming – It seems an age since you left and I have wished for you contantly – If Mar Lou were not here there is no telling what would become of me – As it is – I am in a measure contented, for I could not be so constantly with her, were you here – I am so fond of my Beloved, that I cannot stay with my best friend when he is near – We were very much disappointed yesterday that Captain Butler did not come – The cars did not go out on Wednesday – Arrived about 4 in the afternoon & found every thing so frozen up, that they could get not water from the tank – So they remained inactive until late evening. We were all glad to hear the Captain was coming & Ma had a nice dinner cooked & charged Uncle John to bring him up – Sister had her home-spun ready for the occasion & expected to make him waver in his attachment for the young lady at Jackson. What do you think of Kittie? Going down to Meridian she abused widowers unnecessarily – He was certainly kind & attentive to her, gave her his shawl to make her more comfortable & when she returned it, remarked that he prized it very highly, as it had been his wife’s. Kit was thunder-struck – she had never heard that he belonged to the abused class – I hope he came to-day. The cars arrived as we were going to dinner – Kittie got home on Tuesday – Also arrived on that day to Ma’s & Mrs Anderson’s great joy the body of the unfortunate

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Doctor – He is still unburied – as the ground is too hard frozen to dig the grave – Sallie has been very sick, so poor Mrs A- is in distress in every way. Haven’t we had a splendid freeze? The Captain was here Tuesday night, as impudent as ever. When he left, I thought it must be snowing & sure enough next morn the whole earth was covered – Mar Lou & I have had such charming walks – The next evening we started, enjoyed the walk finely, tho’ both got a hard fall. I was building air-castles for our entertainment, & like the milk-maid – I found them over-turned, by my own fall. We went to see Lizzie Bradshaw this morning – She looked really blue & wintry, tho’ we were in a glees, with the rosiest cheeks — and noses you ever saw – Poor Mr B- has been suffering from an attack of his old enemy, and is still confined to his room. He begs that you will come to see him when you return. We all wished for you Wednesday night Mar Lou & I made some elegant ice-cream – You would have enjoyed it – Your letter came that night – Pa gave it to me, saying “here is a letter for the Major” – He has not become accustomed to my new name yet. I have any quantity of things to tell you, but will wait until to-morrow. Isn’t it too nice? The idea of seeing you so soon – I am mighty sorry Edward was sick, hope he is well again & able to assist you, in taking possession of your new quarters – It will be very disagreeable for you to have to stay all night at Junction when you come down. I am afraid you will not come as often as when we were engaged – Pa & Ma send their love. Kit was delighted, at the affectionate measure in which you spoke of her – She & Mar Lou desire their love – Mammie has gone to see her father – I shall get Mr Warren to take this to the Junction as you suggested – if he finds you there he will give it to you – In the hope of seeing you soon I am your happy & devoted little wife

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I wrote to you on Tuesday & enclosed a letter from some of your friends


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.