Letter – Beauchamp, 5 November 1869

2015.002.154b

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter by Thomas K. Jackson’s friend Beauchamp, requesting that Jackson pick up his wife from the train.


Macon Miss

Nov 5. 1869

Maj. T.K. Jackson

Dear Major

Mrs Beauchamp proposes to be on the cars that arrive at your place Tuesday morning the 9 Just will you be so kind as to meet her at the Cars

Yours Truly

JJ Beauchamp


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 1 August 1865

2015.002.153

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson to his wife Lucy, from Gainesville, AL. This letter is the continuation of one written by Thomas on July 30th. He has just arrived in town, and Lucy’s father is busy with preparations to visit Washington, D.C. He writes that there are no African American troops yet occupying the town. He mentions an upcoming meeting with a doctor, whom he hopes will provide some advisement for Thomas and his wife.


-Page 1-

At Home, Aug. 1. 1865.

My Darling,

I have just arrived in town – 5 1/2 O’clk. P.M. – and have but a moment to say half a word & close my letter – I find yr Father busy as forty beehives in full operation, completing his arrangements for his visit to Washington, He has deferred his departure until Thursday, having found it impracticable to get ready earlier. I was glad to see Jimmie, & devoured yr dear charming letter rapturously – Oh my sweet wife, I am too happy to learn that your health is so good, and your spirits so joyous & happy – My Love, you must not suffer anything to disturb or depress you, & believe in my assurances that every body loves, and your husband adores you,

I learn that little Carrie is not so well this evening

-Page 2-

as she was yesterday – Yr Uncle John is “hors de combat” with the breaking out on his ancles – There are no negro troops in town yet, & I do not know that any are expected – I will counsel with Dr Williams to-morrow, or this evening, if I can see him, & advise you of his advice &c. I will try to write a little to you tomorrow, giving you all the news I can gather, at present, I am ignorant of the sayings & doings in town. Susan has returned, & expresses herself charmed with her visit. My best love to Mother, Sister Aunt Bet, all at Kemper, Good ngiht my precious, & may the Good Lord guide & protect you,

Your devoted husband

TKJ


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 30 July 1864

2015.002.152

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Post-war letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson to his wife Lucy, from Cedar Bluff, AL. Thomas tells his wife that he has been writing “Proclamation Oaths” for Lucy’s father, who is a judge. Her father has also been working on an application for a “special pardon” for Thomas. The previous day’s paper contained information from the governor on how to apply for one, and how questions would need to be answered for a successful application. Thomas describes the recent weather conditions and how they have affected the crops. They are selling her mother’s cotton in town, for which her father “expects to receive from 20 to 22 cents in gold.” He also mentions a “tournament” held for the entertainment of the local young ladies and gentlemen, and that a friend offered to give him a few hunting dogs to train.


-Page 1-

Cedar Bluff,

Sunday, July 30. 1865.

My precious Wife,

I remained at home last night as I expected, and came up here this morning, bringing little Katy with me to see her mother. I was occupied part of the day yesterday writing off some “Proclamation Oaths” for yr Father, while he drew up my application for “special pardon”; he also prepared applications for a number of other parties – Mine is a master-piece, and, according to my judgement, makes a better showing than any I have seen. Carrie was some better last evening, though quite sick – and I regret I did not learn her condition this morning, for, having to come by the Farm, I forgot to do so. I sent Bettie’s letter to her yesterday by Dr Alexander, (wonder if Mrs Whiteside doesn’t wish she had married him?)

I shall commence sending your mothers cotton to town tomorrow, as the Judge wishes to dispose of it before his departure, & to expediate its delivery there, a wagon has been ordered from the prairie to assist. There are seventeen bales – The Judge expects to receive from 20 to 22 ct in gold for it, which, he says he will pack up with your Mother’s name marked upon it, and will lock it up in the iron safe.

Yesterdays paper, which was not received until

-Page 2-

late, contains a Proclamation by Gov. [missing], issued for the information & guidance of all those applying for “special pardon”, through him; and enumerating certain questions, which the applicant must answer satisfactorily, to insure a favorable consideration of his petition by the Governor – This entails an alteration in, or rather, a postscript added to, our applications – I shall, therefore, go to town Tuesday afternoon to attend to this correction in mine, and to see yr Father off on the following morning. I hope you will receive the letter I sent to you, by Express, yesterday. I discover that some rain fell here yesterday, but not sufficient to do the crop much good – a steady rain for some hours, would be of great service to the growing corn just now. To-day has been unusually cool and delightful, a fine breeze has been blowing all day long, with the sun partially obscured by light clouds.

As I rode from Warsaw Friday evening, I discovered quite a collection of ladies and gentlemen in the distance, whom, I have since concluded, had assembled to celebrate a “Tournament”, as this species of gentle, and joyous pastime, seems to be occupying the attention of the chivalric youths, and damsels fair, in the surrounding neighborhood. Had I been apprised of such an opportunity, I might have entered the lists & essayed a course in honor of her, who, whether

-Page 3-

present or absent, reigns sole queen of my heart.

Tomorrow I should ride out for the purpose of buying some bacon, for the use of this Farm, I hope to secure about 500 lbs @ 10 ct. I shall first apply to Old Mr Wm Little who, if he cannot supply me, may be able to direct my further search.

Yesterday while speaking of dogs in the presence of Mr [McNettly?], I expressed my predilection for pointers & setters, when he spoke up and said he had two or three superior full blooded English setters, which he would take great pleasure in letting me have, if I would train the two puppies & save one of them for him. I accepted the offer at once, and he promised to bring them up, about the 6th prox. when he brings the terrier for Mother.

You are not to be alarmed, for they shall not give you the least inconvenience. And now my precious Love, good night – Do I not love thee my precious one? Go ask the whispering breezes, whose name so oft as [???], is breathed upon their balmy flight. With holy blessings on your darling head, again good night.

Monday July 31, 1865, I have omitted to mention my dear Lucy, in these daily notes, that Major Beauchamp spent a couple of days in Gainesville last week – I met him a few miles from town as I came

-Page 4-

up the first time – He was looking quite [missing] usual, and said, he left his family well, [missing] had reached Macon without accident. Mr Rogers told me Saturday, the Major had failed to sell his house, owing to the exhorbitant price he demands – I did not see Mrs Pool or any of her family when I was down – The fact is, I was only at home early in the morning & at night.

I feel the want of some body to talk to up here; so that if you were here, I doubt if you would ever find any cause for complaint on that score. I started over to Old Bill Little’s this morning, after dispatching three wagons loaded with cotton to town, but before I got quite to his house I met one of his servants, who informed me the the Old Man had gone to Gainesville, so I shall have to goover in the morning – I met with quite a little adventure on the road near Old Mr Daniels, the details of which I must reserve for some future occasion, merely explaining now that I very innocently stumbled upon the rendezvous of a pair of lovers, & temporarily interrupted their assignation. On my return I rode through Warsaw to enjoy the only inviting thing I have, or wish to discover in that wretched place, viz: a cool drink of water. I also called at Mr Kirkland’s to take him to task about some rails he has been appropriating from your Father’s fences. He was not at home – but I shall find him – Last night & this forenoon have been quite cool, rendering outdoors exercises delicious & exhilerating.

I expect to go home tomorrow afternoon, when I shall finish & dispatch this note to you my Love


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 23 July 1864

2015.002.151

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis, from Gainesville, AL.¬†Jackson writes of a shopping trip to Memphis that Lucy’s mother has planned. He informs Lucy that her father is heading to Linden via Livingston, and that her mother is planning another trip to Lauderdale. Thomas writes that he misses Lucy, and mentions that he has had trouble sleeping at night. To stave off a potential illness, he plans on taking a good amount of medicine that day.


-Page 1-

Office, July 23/64

My Darling,

I did not intend writing you today, but yr mother desired me to inform sister, that she disapproved of the purchase of Miss Mar Lou’s dyed silk, and to apprize you, That Miss Thornton & Mr Dobb purpose setting out for Memphis on Monday week. 2nd of Augt. She intends sending by Mr Dobb for a black silk dress for Sister, & thought you & she would like to be at home before they start, so as to

-Page 2-

make up a memorandum of such articles as you would like him to get for you – If this suggestion comports with your wishes, advise me of it, & I will arrange to arrive at Mr Minge’s on Friday the 29th inst. so that you may reach home on the Sunday following. If otherwise, you need not expect me at Farmsdale until Tuesday the 2 of Augt. Your mother desires me to say, also, that she has written to you, & forwarded a letter to Miss Kittie, 7 two to you,

-Page 3-

& begs Miss Kittie not to think it strange if hers has the appearance of having been opened – She tore the old envelope so, in her efforts to erase the original address, that she was compeled to employ a new one.

Yr Father started to Livingston this morning, en route to Linden, & yr Mother is preparing to carry out her proposed excursion to Lauderdale –

I miss you every hour in the day – Could not sleep last night until two o’clock – Do not know the cause of my

-Page 4-

unusual restlessness – Hope it is not a forerunner of an attack of sickness – Shall, nevertheless fortify myself against such an unwelcome contingency, by taking a good dose of medicine tonight – I pulled a peach to day – it is beautiful & fragrant – & although it will not keep for you to enjoy it, I have put it in yr wardrobe & shall, at least, have the satisfaction of calling it yours for a few days. My tenderness for you, dear Lucy, is unabated – You possess the entire devotion of my heart, & are the only woman to whom the offering was ever made. Oh! my

-Page 1, Crosswritten-

precious wife – I cannot exist without your love which I prize above all earthly blessings Let us never withhold our confidence from each other

yr fond Husband

TKJ

-Page 3 & 4, Upside Down-

Love to my dear Miss Mar. Lou. to Sister & all at Mr Minge’s


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 21 July 1864

2015.002.150

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis Jackson from Gainesville, AL. Thomas tells his wife that he is writing the letter early in the day, so that he may finish work before the intolerably hot weather sets in. He updates Lucy on recent social events and the current affairs of their friends and family at home in Gainesville. Lucy’s mother is still at work preparing a grand supper. Thomas also describes a controversy between two family friends and demonstrated “ill breeding” in one of the young women involved, over an Ice Cream Social. Thomas is planning on seeing Lucy the following week in Farmsdale, and expresses his deep love for his wife.


-Page 1-

Office, July 21, 1864,

My precious Wife,

I have come down early this morning so as to write to you & finish my work before the heat sets in & renders the least exertion intolerable, Mrs F. Bell dined with us yesterday – Says she had to send sister’s bonnet to Livingston to be fixed – no doubt it will be a real “love of a bonnet” when it comes home.

Mrs Bell is very amiable & sweet, & I like her more & more every day – She has partly moved from town – to her plantation I believe – She says the Misses Herndon & Rhodes are visiting near macon Station – I presume Sis saw them – The Judge told me last night that he expected to be in Demopolis next Sunday – the 24th, So if you should happen to be visiting Mrs Pool at that time you would have an opportunity of seeing him – I merely mention this incidentally – He does not expect to meet you there, & it is not supposed that you alter any of your plans to do so, Yr mother & Mr Dobb are wonderfully busy today about “The Supper”- Only think ! they are to have six nice

-Page 2-

roast pigs, & pine coffee – My change begins to burn my pocket already – though I rarely enjoy a supper, (I mean I do not eat with much relish) on such occasions – I am so sorry you all are not here to enjoy the good things to be presented at the entertainment. Mrs O’Neal goes down to Lauderdale to day with various articles of comfort for the sick and wounded there – and good old Mrs Bradshaw is preparing to journey on a similar errand soon. They are in some better spirits about John & have reasons to hope his situation is not so doubtful as at first supposed. Lt. Winston has been here – says he saw John, that his hurt was a flesh wound & by no means regarded as mortal – He thinks John fell into kind hands & believes he is doing well, the family, of course, feel much relieved by even this slight ground of hope,

Mrs Bell & Mrs Van de Graaf took an airing together yesterday evening – I felt gratified to think they had probably compounded their differences & were on good terms again – I like them both too well not to feel some uneasiness at any unpleasantness between them.

The Williamsons are here, and the unpleasant affair which grew out of the Ice-Cream Supper some time since, seems to increase in warmth & bitterness, and receives acrimonious accessions

-Page 3-

from the most unexpected sources – What do you think of Miss Kittie’s telling the Williamson at Kemper that she heard here, they only notified Mrs Lacy of an intended visit to her, to prevent Miss Kitties visiting them at Kemper? I was surprised, & shocked, & hurt when I heard it – & regard it as a most uncalled for exhibition of ill breeding on the part of Miss Kittie – I cannot look, with any degree of complaisancy, upon such gratuitous talking, such a trespass upon good breeding, in anyone, let alone one, who has been treated with so much kindness – indeed – as a member of our family for the past year,

Whoever made the remark, did so in suggestive manner, & I for one believe the inference fair & natural, Miss Mag Williamson called upon yr mother the other day to inquire who made the insinuation, & said Miss Kittie had referred her to Sister – I know nothing further about the interview, but expect they had quite a round – Yr mother, I am sure was firm & dignified; & when required to speak, did so with her usual perspicuity, terseness, and firm decision, For my part, I do not intend to permit the affair to disturb my equanimity in the least, & shall treat whatever they choose to say about me with the contempt it deserves. & I am convinced, that their malicious attempts

-Page 4-

made to mortify you, by the circulation of rumors about me, will recoil with ten fold fury upon some of their heads.

Miss Annie played a good while for me last night – I think her execution of some pieces very good – She played the Anvil Chorus twice for me – She talked a good deal about you, & her expressions were of the most complimentary character – so much so, that she quite won me over, & I am ready to stand by her, & admit that she can not only be agreeable, but even entertaining.

I expect to go for you about next Monday week, & will arrive at Farmsdale on Tuesday the 2nd of August, If any alteration is made in this plan I will advise you – And if the arrangement does not suit you – you must tell me so without reserve, for I am only too happy to do whatever will contribute to your pleasure.

My heart is over flowing with love for you, whom I regard as my good angel – & that the good God, may constantly bless & guard you, is my constant prayer

I send much love to Mr & Mrs Minge, to my charming Miss Mar Lou & all the family – Kiss my sweet little Sister for me & tell her – that her Brother loves her very dearly – Yr Mother

-Page 1, Crosswritten-

& all at home send much love to you – Yr name is never mentioned but with the tenderest affection,

The African potato vine has reached the top of the tallest pole – Indeed I think it has set out for an excursion to Guinea

yr fond & devoted Husband

TKJ

-Page 4, Note –

I sent the palmetto by express yesterday


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 20 July 1864

2015.002.149

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis from Gainesville, AL. Thomas writes that he had a pleasant journey home, and describes the recent weather conditions. He mentions seeing a few army friends in Demopolis and took tea at General Stephen D. Lee’s headquarters, although he did not see the general himself. He mentions meeting the brother in law of General James Longstreet, Colonel George Deas. Thomas updates his wife on her family and friends, including preparations by Lucy’s mother for a grand supper for the soldiers. General Robert E. Lee approved the resignation of Dr. McIvor, whose “services. . . have gone up-to the Confederacy.”


-Page 1-

Office. July 20 1864.

My Darling,

I had an agreeable & quick passage home – The weather was fine, being quite a contrast to that we experienced going down –

Saw Major Butler & Capt Carpenter in Demopolis – they desired to be remembered to you – Butler said he was very sorry that we passed thro’ town without his knowledge, & hopes to have the pleasure of seeing you all during your visit in the “Canebrake.” I took tea at Gen’l Lee’s Hdqrs, & passed a very pleasant night in Meridian – Did not see the Gen’l, but met with quite a number of friends & acquaintances, among them Colo. George Deas – Brother-in-law to General Longstreet – It seemed like old times to see so many familiar faces – & in Camp too. Capt. Williams is at last established in Meridian – He was not there himself – having gone to Selma to assist in pushing forward supplies to Johnston’s Army – but Lewis did the honors of his office – I called for yr fan at Lauderdale, & much to my surprise & satisfaction the clever old land lady produced it intact, though having some signs of service under the administration of greasy hands.

You cannot think how glad I was to recover

-Page 2-

it – not for its worth, but because you seemed to regret its loss. There was nobody at home when I arrived – Yr Mother & Mr Dobb were at the old hospital buildings preparing for the supper, which is to be given tomorrow night – & Miss Annie & Willie were spending the day at Dr Barret’s. I soon refreshed myself with a bath & clean clothes, & started to the hospital to see Yr Mother, but met her & Mr Dobb returning home

All are well at home, except Mary’s baby, which is, & has been very sick – The servants enquired very particularly after you, & seem anxious for yr return. Yr Father is well & in good spirits – He seems glad of my return, says it has been mighty lonesome – wanted to know why I did not bring you & Sis, & says you shan’t leave home any more. The storm that interfered with our comfort at Lauderdale was very violent here – the pontoon lumber down at the river, was scattered about in all directions, one plank striking a member of the guard (named Smith) so violently as to break his scull, & killing him instantly. The Hotel was not injured. tho’ a fair mark for its fury- I have had to write this note under many disadvantages, being constantly interrupted, which will explain its disconnected style. The Judge is going down to Linden next week – He starts on saturday & goes by way of Livingston

-Page 3-

& will probably be in Demopolis on Sunday – I will write to you further on the subject, so that if you contemplate spending a day with Mrs Pool, you may be able to make it convenient to see him in Demopolis as he passes through. He thinks that as he will be dependent upon friends for conveyance to Linden he will not be able to go to Mr Minge’s to see you all

Yr Mother says there will be no Ice cream at the supper – all of McMahon’s having either melted or been disposed of, & she thinks it too expensive to procure it from Columbus – Mrs Lacy, subscribed custard &c for the supper, but after reflection wrote a note to yr mother, to say, that she had done all she felt able to do for the soldiers at the supper “superintended by her (yr mother’s) sisters” & begged that her name might be erased from the list. Funny wasn’t it? – Yr Aunt Carrie says Mrs L had arranged this little episode beforehand, I have not told you half I have to say, but must wait until tomorrow to write more – I am too busy, & so flustered that I scarcely know what I write – I think of you constantly & am happier & better from the [???] – I regard our connexion as the most fortunate circumstance of my life – nothing could compensate me for yr love – You are my good angel, & however wayward I may be my love is

-Page 4-

all your own – I desire much love to Mr & Mrs Minge to dear Miss Mar Lou, & all the family, not forgetting Mrs & Miss Christian – the latter [???] Kathy – has in addition my wishes for the speedy recovery of her usual buoyant spirits – Tell her I saw her Mr Simpson in Meridian – he was looking well.

Sr. Mc Ivor – the son of a Baron, the Brother of a lord & marchioness – has resigned his commission in the Army – I saw him in Meridian – Genl Lee has approved his resignation & his “services,” as he expressed it, “have gone up to the Confederacy” – He has returned to this place to await further action on his resignation. I expect to express the palmetto to day – Yr Mother has not sent it down yet – I am waiting for it. I send much love to my dear little sister & hope she spent a pleasant time with her little friend – We have no Army news – Goodbye Darling

Entirely & most affectionately yrs.

TKJ


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 8 July 1864

2015.002.148

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis Jackson, from Gainesville, AL. Thomas expects to see his wife the next day, and this letter is an update of his recent social outings. Thomas mentions a brass band that is currently occupying the hospital buildings, and writes that the people of the town routinely gather to listen to music.


-Page 1-

Office, July 8./64

My Darling,

Altho’ I expect to be with you tomorrow I cannot allow today to pass without this letter token of rememberance from me – I presume you attended McRae’s wedding, & hope you enjoyed yrself – You must tell me all about it tomorrow – I feel quite an interest in the affair, & wish Mc & his Bride all manner of happiness.

Yr Father returned from Livingston last night after supper – came in quite unexpectedly – we had given

-Page 2-

him up for that day – Mrs Ward took tea, & spent last evening with us – perhaps indeed, she stayed all night, for I was ungallant enough to leave yr mother & her, still chatting away, when I returned about 9 o’clock. The Judge, howver, was with them. Mrs Beauchamp returned yesterday – I had a little chat with her at the carriage door as she passed thro’ town – She seemed much pleased with her visit – and the Major, who has just lef tmy office, was highly delighted – & talked a good deal about the nice things they had, & the pleasant

-Page 3-

folks they met with over there- (Guess who) – We had a nice cantelope for breakfast this morning – I wished for you very much 0 you would have enjoyed the delicate luxury – tho’ perhaps you have plenty where you are – I rode Dick yesterday for the first time since his indisposition – He was in magnificent spirits, & I enjoyed the ride vastly, not-withstanding the ducking I received from a very brisk tho’ refreshing shower. The brass band occupy the Hospital buildings, & constantly regale us with all sorts of sounds – In the evening they

-Page 4-

assemble on the common near Mrs High’s, & discourse music for the entertainment of the town – Equestrians, pedestrians, & carriages gathere there, making quite an animated scene at our end of town. I had a long letter from yr Uncle John this morning – He is well & sends much love to you. I have commenced to read the Historical novel – “Joseph the second” – & like the opening chapters very well.

Give my love to all – Goodbye dearest – my gentle flower – Spring of my life & joy of my soul – May heaven’s blessing always attend you.

Ever fondly yours

TKJ


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Mattie McDonald, 25 February 1864

2015.002.147

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Mattie D. McDonald to her brother, Major Thomas K. Jackson, from Abbeville Court House. McDonald begins by expressing her feelings of depression, as her son has just left to join the Marion Artillery in the Confederate army. He is happy, and only worried about the possibility of his mother “grieving for him.” McDonald finds comfort in her faith. She writes that her husband was re-elected to a position, and that they now live on a farm, which she finds lonely. They have experienced financial difficulties, and they may have to sell their slaves. There is much “grumbling about the taxation and present currency” [inflation]. She mentions a recent visit from a cousin, who had previously been taken prisoner and concludes by complimenting her brother’s new wife, Lucy, and imploring him to write when he can.


-Page 1-

Abbeville C. H.

Feb 25th. /64

My Dear Brother

I have postponed writing to you on account of business and until I should feel more in the humor for writing the latter feeling has not arrived and I must this evening begin feeling as if I had not two ideas in my head, I wrote to sister Lucy the letter you will please forward to her as I did not know exactly how to direct, I am sure she will consider me very dull and prosy, but I fear I shall never feel as I once did, nor ever be light hearted again.

My darling has left me two week ago for the army, he joined the Marion Artillery on the Sh & Ch. R.R. near Charleston, he intended going in Cavalry until three days before he started, when he changed his mind and joined the light Artly Mr McDonald went with him staid until he was regularly established, when he returned leaving him as Willie himself expressed it “as happy as a Soldier can be,” poor child his youthful eyes look on the bright side alone, he thinks not of danger and the only thing which seems to disturb him is, the

-Page 2-

thought that I will grieve for him, I conceal it from him as much as possible, try to write cheerfully and resigned but I tell you “my heart is bound up in the lad” and I am miserable at times, had I not long ere this learned to seek comfort from a higher source, and to commit my all to a higher power I know not how I should bear this greatest sorrow and trial that has ever fallen on my path – Brother if you ever pray (and I trust you do) ask the great God to spare my boy.

You ask about Mr McD – he was relected by quite a majority – but business is at a low tide – he has bought a nice little farm moved to it, and we are now enjoying rustic life. I find it lonely, we live two miles from fathers in a pretty cheerful looking place on the road to Calhoun Mills; the house is small but quite good for a country place and susceptible of improvements which latter we intend making as soon as circumstances will allow – We were almost obliged to make a change, or sell off our negroes, Mr McD prefered the former course, and this decision finds us in the country – Our wheat and Oat crop looked well this is encourageing for provisions are enormously high

-Page 3-

Things or times rather in Abbeville are dull and gloomy at present. you do not hear much but grumbling about the taxation, and the present currency – persons without money are bad off and those who have it, not much better off – I cannot see why persons should grumble at loosing, when all suffer alike, more or less as they have possesions; for my part if my friends can be spared it is all I ask, if everything else should go I will not murmur once

We had a visit from cousin Willie Turner, you remember he was wounded in the foot at Fishing Creek and taken prisoner he looks well, but quite lame – his mother is dead, uncle Turner very feeble and infirm, one of his brothers was killed at Corinth – cousin Henry H. is in the army stationed in Columbia, Humphrey is not in the army, never has been, he is exempt – on account of his attention to the Mill ___ Well, you are married at last and I am glad to think it, I feel that you have gotten a good and gentle wife, Make her a good and gentle husband, always have patience, and love her above all others, you must not think this strange advice – but remember it ever – Minnie has another son two children now – write when convenient and always remember me as your

affectionate sister M. D. McDonald


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

William Thomas McDonald was the son of Martha D. Jackson McDonald and Matthew McDonald of Abbeville, SC. He was born in 1846 and was just 18 years old when he enlisted. He survived the war and went on to become a merchant and mail carrier. He died in 1916.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 4 February 1864

2015.002.146

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his wife Lucy Reavis Jackson, dated February 4th, 1864, from Macon, Mississippi. Thomas writes that he has been bombarded with paperwork that morning. He mentions how Lucy’s uncle Ned came by to visit on his way to Tuscaloosa. He remarks on a few young ladies he has met whose “sweethearts” were sent away on military service. Thomas expects to see his wife soon, and writes that he has a proposal for her when he arrives.


-Page 1-

Macon Feb. 4. 1864.

My darling,

I’ve had so many letters and papers to pour over this morning, that my ideas are somewhat confused, but I must write a line to my precious wife – Her partiality will excuse all imperfections – Who do you think called to see me yesterday? Your uncle “Ned” – He dropped in, & out in his usual spasmodic style – Came up in the morning, and returned in a few hours – expected to be in Gainesville this evening, on his way to Tuscaloosa – I recd yr letter by the servant, & the one written yesterday – The improvement in your dear mother’s health relives my anxiety – She is endeared to me, not only because she is the mother of my Darling, but because of her unwearied, unvarying goodness to me – and if a sincere affection may requite such kindness, such motherly interest, I am sure she has mine unreservedly – I saw the Misses Alice & Dora Bush, the other day – those tender “shrubs”- whose sweethearts, unrelenting

-Page2-

military orders have torn from them – They seem to be very nice girls – but shout so loud when they talk or laugh, that I am constantly afraid they will fracture their voices – What do you think – A young lady told me she always had the misfortune to find, when she fell in love with a gentleman, that he was married, “and”, said she after a pause, “really major I can’t somehow bring my self to believe you are married” – Major Cheatham is here – has been very attentive at Mr Gauch’s – Miss Edith is the fair enchantress – at least, it is so understood here I hope he is a worthy gentleman – for she is a charming woman – I expect to be with you on the 7. or 8, & count the very minutes – tardy minutes when love waits – ’till the happy day arrives – when I shall embrace my loved, my darling wife – Oh! happy thought – The world affords no sweeter, dearer wish, to me – I have something to propose to you & Miss Mar: Lou: when I get home – I’m sure you have already guessed what it is – but wait ’till I come – Give my love to all at home, I do not expect to write again until I see you – Goodbye Sweetness – & believe in the constancy & love of your devoted husband

“Tom”


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Lucy Reavis, 3 February 1864

2015.002.145

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Lucy Reavis Jackson to her husband, Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., dated February 3rd, 1864, from Gainesville, Alabama. Lucy praises Thomas for the elegant and romantic letters he sends her. She updates him on the health and overall well-being of her family, including the illness of her aging mother. Lucy mentions that many people have recently been married, and she hopes that they are as happy as she and Thomas.


-Page 1-

Home Feb. 3d 1864.

You are too good to me, my dear Darling- I have another letter to-day, written yesterday, for which accept many thanks – Your letters are perfect models, when I read them to Mar Lou, she wonders if all men write to their wives so sweetly – and says if she is not in love with you, she is with your delightful, affectionate letters – she has not learned yet, that my beloved one is different, superior to all other men – I must write fast, or my letter will not go this afternoon, Uncle John has already come up. Do you know I received two letters from you yesterday – In the morning one came dated the 31st, In the afternoon came another, the 25th Where had it been for a whole week? But though I had several of a later date, it was mighty sweet – It does me good to see soon your hand-writing.

I am afraid though Nannies’ “wanderings have ceased” you will not soon derive any benefit from the “contract”- She is going to school again – a great burlesque Ma thinks – In her spare hours she has to dress & visit, so has little time to devote to you – Now, you see, if you had given it to me, I should have taken the greatest pleasure in making the bag, and it would have been completed long ago. They all say, I am jealous of the least attention, shown you by others – that I want you all, myself. Am I – Can I be – so selfish? Mittie has not been to school this week – She is really a martyr to sore throat – Then too she is a little blue – Mar Lou and I had a delightful walk yesterday afternoon – met one of Mr Giles servants, who had come in to send a dispatch to Mr G. His mother is very ill – I am so sorry, the old lady is quite old & delicate & there are so few in the family, they cannot afford a single member – I hope sincerely she will recover- He was not at home when his

-Page 2-

father died – so now they always telegraph as soon as any one is sick. Dinner is ready – Well. the troublesome meal is over. You should see me presiding at the table, during Ma’s sickness – Quite matronly I look – Ma is better, improving every day. She is up and dressed – enjoying a bird, that Jimmie shot for her dinner – Do you like to hunt? Ma sends Jim ought every day to shoot her a bird – Here are a number of doves in the orchard. Capt Williams was at the wedding last night – They were married by a Catholic Priest & he says, he never heard a woman, made to promise so much The people are quite in the notion of marrying – All following our example – I hope they will all love each other as truly & be as happy as we are & always intend to be. Fannie Isbell is to marry a Mr Winston next Wednesday – He is a rich, young lawyer from Arkansas. She met with him New Years eve & the old tale – love at first sight – Didn’t they hurry yp matters? The Misses Sledge show great taste, in preferring you to their beaux – I know they regret not having met you sooner – I am glad you like them so well – Captain Williams goes to Columbus this evening. He will return some time next week, to settle up accounts – Ma & Sister both send much love & want to see you mighty bad – For myself – I cannot restrain my impatience – And every letter I get makes me love you better & desire more ardently to see you – Uncle John got the things you wanted – to make ink I suppose – but they all say Dr Park’s recipe is not good – they tried it & failed – Poor Captain [Haines?] died to-day – I am so sorry for his daughters – It was a shame in his wife to leave him nothing, when she died – Uncle John says he must go & I am at the end of my page, so will say no more – You have been so good, about writing to me – Do continue

-Page 1, Crosswritten-

to do so – It is so easy for you to write nice letters & they give me so much joy – Goodbye my dear Major I shall count the days until I see you – Give me love to Kate & Edith & tell them not to go distracted about you –

Yours devotedly Lucy-


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.