Letter – Daniel Adams, 22 January 1863

2015.002.157

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Copy of a Confederate letter by Brigadier General Daniel W. Adams to James A. Seddon, Secretary of War, from Marietta, GA. This copy is in the handwriting of Randall Lee Gibson. Adams is petitioning Seddon to promote Colonel Gibson to brigadier general. Gibson is currently commanding the consolidated 13th and 20th Louisiana regiments. Gibson was on continuous duty through the Kentucky and Tennessee Campaigns, and was particularly admirable at the Battle of Perryville. Adams also mentions the “great gallantry” that Gibson displayed in the battles before Murfreesboro. Gibson also commanded Adams’ brigade during the Brigadier General’s absence, as part of Major General John C. Breckenridge’s division. The letter includes testimonies from Brigadier General Patton Anderson, Lieutenant General Leonidas Polk, Brigadier General William Preston, and Lieutenant General William Hardee, all of whom are supportive of Gibson’s promotion.


-Page 1-

Marietta Ga Jan 22nd 1863

Sir,

I have the honor to call your especial attention to Col R L Gibson of Louisiana now commanding the 13th & 20th La Regts Consolidated – formerly commanding the 13th La with the view of recommending him for promotion to the Rank of Brigadier Genl

Col Gibson entered the service on the 16th day of April 1861 and has since been actively and assiduously engaged in in it. Within my knowledge – that is since the 1st day of August last at which time his Regiment became a portion of the Brigade under my command he has been continuously on duty through the Ky and Tenn Campaigns. [???] battle of Perryville Ky in command of his Regiments under my immediate and personal observation he displayed great courage, gallantry, coolness, self possession as I have testimony in my official report of the part taken by my Brigade in that battle – throughout the long & arduous march of that Kentucky Campaign he was prompt and energetic in the discharge of his duties. In the recent battles before Murfreesboro he again displayed great gallantry & courage in the engagement of the 31st of December as I have officially reported; and in the engagement of of the 2nd inst as a part of Major Genl Breckinridge’s Div – he being the senior colonel commanded my Brigade in my absence which was caused by my being slightly wounded disabled by a slight wounded received on the 31st of Dec and acquitted himself as I have been credibly informed with great credit.

To my knowledge he is well acquainted and

-Page 2-

proficient in Battalion & Brigade drill and with the rules & regulations of the service and has had considerable experience at [???] during his time of service as a Brigade Commander.

I feel confidently in the assurance that he is well qualified to command a Brigade and deserving the promotion to a Brigadier Generalship; in which opinion I doubt not my superiors in command in this Army will fully and most cheerfully concur. I have the honor to be

very respectfully

(signed) Dan W Adams Brig Genl

Comdg Adams Brigade

Breckinridge’s Div Hardee’s Corps

Hon James A Seddon

Sec of War C.S.A.

Richmond VA.

I take pleasure in adding my testimony to the above. Col Gibson Regiment during the Kentucky campaign composed a part of a Brigade in the Division I commanded. I had opportunities of observing him, and can say is truth, that he managed his Regt on the arduous march with skill and judgment and was highly spoken of by his Brigade Commander for his gallantry [?] on the field of Perryville. I consider him quite competent to command a Brigade.

(signed) Patton Anderson

Brig. Genl. P.A.

I cordially concur in the recommendation of Col Gibson to the office of Brigadier Genl. Col Gibson has shown himself both capable and faithful and would command a Brigade with credit to himself and advantage to our cause,

(signed) L Polk

Lt Genl C.S.A

-Page 3-

I have long known Colonel Gibson and esteemed him for his cultivated intellect, his spotless character and great worth as a gentleman. In my association with him for the last year, and in the trying scenes from shiloh to murfreesboro, my regard has been augmented by finding in him all the qualities of a gallant and skillful soldier, it affords me pleasure to add the feeble testimony of my name to the distinguished recommendations of others under whom he has served to testify my entire confidence in his fitness for promotion to the rank of Brigadier Genl and my belief that the President cannot bestow it on a more faithful, diligent, and meritorious officer,

(signed) Wm Preston

Brigadier Genel Comdg Breckinridge’s Div

I concur in the recommendations given on behalf of Col. Gibson, and cordially recommend him to the President for Brigadier General.

W.J. Hardee

(signed) Lieut General

Hdqrs Hardees Corps

Tullahoma Feb 1st 1863


Randall Lee Gibson was born in 1832 in Versailles, KY into a family of slave-owning planters. He attended Yale and was a member of the Skull and Bones society. After graduating in 1853 he then studied at the University of Louisiana Law School (Tulane) and received his bachelor’s in law. When Louisiana seceded, Gibson joined the 1st LA Artillery as a captain. He was then commissioned as colonel of the 13th LA Infantry. A year after this letter was sent on his behalf, he was finally promoted to brigadier general for the Atlanta and Franklin-Nashville Campaigns. He was captured at Cuba Station, AL May 8, 1865 and paroled on May 14, 1865. After the war he returned to Louisiana and was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1874, then the Senate in 1882. He died December 15, 1892.

Requisition – March 1862

2015.002.155

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Confederate document from the Shiloh Campaign era, circa March 1862, requisitioning funds to supply clothing to the 5th (later 35th) Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, of which O. F. Bruster was quartermaster. The document was approved and signed by Major General William J. Hardee, Colonel Patrick R. Cleburne, and Colonel Benjamin J. Hill.

Letter – Thomas Jackson, 6 September 1863

2015.002.133

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., to his fiancée Lucy Reavis of Gainesville, AL, from Enterprise, MS. Jackson writes how happy he was to receive a letter from Reavis, as his “anxiety was fast becoming intolerable.” He mentions having dinner with the paymaster, Captain Decker, in Meridian. Mrs. Decker is a friend of General Hardee, and is planning to request that Captain Decker be sent to Enterprise. Jackson mentions the train times from Demopolis, as he is planning on visiting Reavis. He then expresses his great love for Reavis, and writes that he will get a photograph taken while in Mobile. Jackson concludes by mentioning a compliment he received from the Chief Commissary of Mississippi.


-Page 1-

Enterprise Miss.

Sept 6. 1863.

Thanks – thanks, my own sweet Lucy, for your charming letter, every word of which is a breathing echo of your dear self – I have just received it, & am the happiest man alive – even this stupid Enterprise wears a cheerful smile this morning – My anxiety was fast becoming almost intolerable – it had been so long since I had heard from you – I have also, this morning a kind letter from yr Mother [missing] she was still at Kemper, but was to be at home today – Yr Father had returned – They were all quite well. I spent part of last Friday at Meridian & took tea with the Paymaster, Captain Decker & his family, consisting of his wife & her sister, whom I met

-Page 2-

for the first time – Mrs Decker is a charming lady, & I do not know when I passed an evening so pleasantly. Meridian has been vastly improved lately – ditched, policed, & numerous wells dug, adding immeasurably to the comforts of the sick & passing soldiers. Mrs D. says she intends to see Gen’l Hardee – whom she knows very well – and ask him to order the Captain to this place, which I should regard as a piece of good fortune, for she knows so many of my old friends, is so intelligent, entertaining & I think such a delightful Lady to visit.

The train from Demopolis is due at Meridian at half after five P.M. so you will have to remain there ’till 4 A.M. for the “up train” – It will be quite convenient & pleasant for me to go for you, because I have some business in that direction, & would like to get a glimpse of the coun-

-Page 3-

try so as to set about it at the proper time understandingly; so if my coming be entirely agreeable to you – write immediately & acquaint one with the day you wish to start, so that my arrangements may be made accordingly, & be sure to furnish me with the necessary directions to find you in the “Canebrake” – such as when to leave the cars &c &c

A delightful rain is falling now cooling the air & laying the dust – How welcome it is! for the heat has been intense & the dust [missing] most suffocating during these past ten days – Oh! my love, I have been so joyous & happy all day in the possession of your dear, dear letter – With what tenderness I regard each word traced by yr loved hand! If possible, I love you more than ever, and long for the day which is to

-Page 4-

unite our hands, as, I fondly [missing], our hearts are already united – I am going to Mobile soon & shall comply with your request about the picture – My letters to yr Mother were only little friendly epistles about nothing in particular, but I told her I had something serious to write to her about, but have not yet been able to approach her with the subject – When I see you I will tell you what it is, [missing] perhaps you can assist me, [missing] remind me of it, if I should forget – I received quite a complimentary letter from the Chief Commissary of Mississippi the other day, & feel right down rain about it – I didn’t know I was such a clever fellow. Goodbye my love – Ever yours

Thos K Jackson


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – Lucy Reavis, 3 September 1863

2015.002.132

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Lucy Reavis to her fiancé, Major Thomas K. Jackson, C.S.A., from Norwood, AL. Reavis mentions that it took some time for Jackson’s last letter to reach her, possibly due to the 12-year-old postmaster at Fannsdale. She requests a photograph of Jackson, and recites a fantastically bad pun from her travels. Several generals are in town, including Hardee, Breckenridge, and Pemberton, whose name “was never mentioned without execrations.” She mentions seeing the defenses at Demopolis, the death and burial of a family friend, as well as her time at church. Though she has met several young men and soldiers, she promises that she will remain faithful to Jackson.


-Page 1-

No 5

Norwood September 3d/63

I was so glad my dear Major, to hear from you, yesterday, that I must answer your letter immediately – It is strange that it should have taken so long to some, only a few miles – But the fault may have been with the post Master at Fannsdale, who is a little boy of 12 years of age I believe – It has been so long since I left home, that I have forgotten many things I had to say to you – but must try to remember – Tuesday morning was very cool, even disagreeably so, but it was much better both for us and the ponies, we stopped at Mrs Gould’s to dinner as we intended and passed a couple of hours very pleasantly, although both Captain G- and one of his little daughters were quite sick – Mrs Goodey looked so sad. I wonder if she did love that old man – He left a very peculiar will – Altho’ so immensely rich, he left his wife only $50000 in money & six servants. To his adopted

-Page 2-

Son, $40000 & six servants – and all of his property besides, which amount to two or three hundred thousand, to be given to an asylum in South Carolina, provided no minister is allowed to have any thing to do with the institution – Isn’t that too bad? He was a Unitarian – Poor fellows! About Sun. set, we reached the place which so surprises all visitors & were cordially received by Misses Innes & Butler – And now I must tell you that I was exceedingly disappointed in the beauty of the former – Uncle John said she was a model, a perfect Venus – and you were scarcely less warm thought her features so regular & delicate. She has a very ugly mouth I think & can not compare in beauty to Kate but I admire her character more. I think she is lovely – There were three Missourians there, from the Camp at Demopolis, and it was beautiful to see, how she addressed herself to them, trying to put them at their ease, and make them forget that they were strangers – Then too she is more anxious to do something for all of her guests than Kate & Butler – In fact she is sweet as can be, and

-Page 3-

I admire her very much, but like Kate the best, She is so good tempered, & full of fun & mischief – I saw more of her too – We were in the same room, all the time & talked until 12 every night – Whenever I was still a moment, she would say in the most comforting, soothing way – “Don’t you be blue, the Major is well” – She wanted me to tell her all about our affairs & asked me if she might not be one of the Attendants One thing I did not like; I heard her asking Mr Dobb, if we were not engaged & when we were to marry – He told her it was certainly to be, tho’ no day or special time had been appointed – He is very wise, Isn’t he? Capt: Carpenter was there the night we arrived, looked very well & natural, raved about you just as usual – said he should write you the following day – He is still devoted to you & says although he is so nicely fixed, he would gladly resign to be the least of your clerks. He says, he is not in love with Rosa Lightfoot, but the Thorntons say he is – I asked Kate if she thought he would be successful, she said no – but that he would not be rejected, while we was such a convenience-

-Page 4-

They are constantly receiving articles from their home at Pass Christian & Capt: C – being at D- receives & forwards them – I sang for Butler & then she sang for me – I was delighted with her voice – The upper notes are splendid, and if she practiced a good-deal, the lower would harmonize – As it is – her voice is like two persons singing, in one part so low & even feeble & in the other so powerful & melodious – She plays beautifully – She expressed her delight at my delightful & beautifully cultivated voice – If I had her voice, I know, I would sing divinely – But it matters little – You do not care much for music – and I do not care a great deal about pleasing any one else – You have no idea of how frequently my thoughts are with you and how truly I long to do something for your pleasure – Do tell me, is there nothing I can do? It would make me so happy – You will not be surprised to hear that we remained at Col: Thorntons until Thursday morning – I did not see a great deal of Mrs T- she was with her little sick grand child – but the Colonel is such a fine old man. We talked about our relatives & he thinks we are certainly

-Page 5-

cousins. Kate calls me nothing but “little Pet.” she is very curious to see you & wanted to know, if I had your picture. The next time you go to Mobile, do have it taken for me – Mr Dobb read “Tannhauser” to me as we rode along – It is beautiful – I must read it again for myself – He was as witty as usual during our ride – As we looked around and saw nothing but corn fields, east & west – he remarked – “Verily, this is a Corn-federacy” I was so amused at Mr Bradshaw – After you all left, Mrs D. asked Uncle John to give us a passport. He said – “Just write Mr Dobb & Lady”- But I said “No such thing, put Miss L. Reavis & Attendant” – Mr B- thought it was too good, went off down the street chuckling & shaking –

We took dinner at Mrs Pool’s Thursday – she was not at home, but we had a pleasant time with her sister. The streets were crowded with soldiers & officers – There were several Generals in town also. Pemberton, Hardee, Breckenridge & one or two from Mobile. Mrs Hayden told us that the former’s name was never mentioned without execrations. I hear that his men are to be organized at Enterprise – You will have a full

-Page 6-

benefit. We saw the defenses at Demopolis – The only thing of the kind I ever saw – They were busy at work on them as we passed – What do you think of my stupidity? When we got to the road leading here, I forgot to tell George & never thought of it, until we were several miles out of our road. Then we had to go into highways & by ways & did not get to the house until nearly 11 at night – We rung the bell, but no one heard us, so I came to the back gallery & knocked at Mar Lou’s door – as it happened Mr Mine was not at home – and the girls were terribly frightened Liz says, “Is that you Lucy” & I replied “Yes, it is Lucy Reavis”- But although they knew my voice, they feared some one was deceiving them & would not let me in for some moments – But we were delighted to meet. Of course, they are much quieter & less cheerful than formerly, but we have a very nice time together – Kittie Christian is as lively and funny as ever – I have not seen her before since I left schoo – Mar Lou is the same sweet girl – I know you must like her, when you know her – If you do not, I shall be so put out – She says if you come for me, she will be glad

-Page 7-

to see you, but that am to stay a long time – I expect I shall go home the latter part of next week, or the first of the week after – Do you think it will be perfectly convenient for you to come? – & do you think it will be pleasant for you? I do not wish to give you any trouble & perhaps some one will come from home – The girls are as busy as can be, making up black dresses & Mrs Minge is dying some. She looks so sad seldom smiles – but of course, she can not feel cheerful yet when George has not been dead three weeks – They carry wreaths & bouquets to his grave twice a week – He is buried in the church yard – where they are obliged to see his grave whenever they go to church – I like it so much. We feel serious & more humble, after passing among graves & we are better prepared to confess our sins before God – Mr Dobb preached & pleased the congregation very much –

I met such a nice gentleman the other day. Colonel Saunders of Pemberton’s Staff – There are few young men in the neighborhood & no possible hope of Maj Adam’s return, so be at ease & know that my heart will not go astray. I do not

-Page 8-

mean to mention that it would under any circumstances, for no one can compare with you in any respect I think – Mar Lou says her cousin Carter is as much in love with me as ever, but even if it is true, it gives me no pleasure – I am very much obliged to your sister for her kind messages – give my best love to her when you write & say that I deserve no thanks or credit for “taking compassion” on you, for my love was involuntary – I could not keep it, moreover any girl ought to feel proud of loving & being beloved by such a man – Don’t you agree with me? Say yes. I do hope your Sister will like me – for I love every body that is dear to you – I am so sorry Willie is going in the army. A mother must suffer, when she gives up her only child – It was right funny that you should dream of me with my hair cut off, for Mar Lou & I are tlaking very seriously of shaving our heads – Wouldn’t it be nice? Then next Summer we would have such nice little short curls – I have not heard from home yet, but will write this morning. I expect Ma has returned by this time – What did you write to Ma about? You & she have entirely too much to say to each other – I know

-Page 1, Crosswritten-

Uncle John will be delighted to be with you – What sensible person would not? I told [Jennie?] Thornton of the admiration she had excited in G- (Uncle John you remember) She was crazy to know who it was & said she should make him a tobacco pouch & knit him some socks when he joined the army – she said it must be a widower, that they frequently took a fancy to her & declared her the image of a poor dear, dead wife – I assured her the gentleman in question admired her for herself alone – I have written a long letter, but am convinced you will not be displeased – Do write to me soon, dear Major, for if you wait very long, it will not arrive before my departure – I dont know what to number my letter, but as yours is No 5. I reckon mine is also – I am so warm, I dont know what to do – have no idea what I have written – Goodbye my dear, dear Major –

Yours

L. Reavis


Lucy Reavis (age 21 in 1863) was the daughter of prominent judge, Turner Reavis. She met her future husband Thomas K. Jackson while he was stationed in Gainesville AL. They married December 16, 1863. At least 30 known letters exchanged between them during the war years have survived. They had five children together. Lucy passed away in 1876 at just 33 years old. Thomas never remarried.

Thomas K. Jackson was born December 12, 1824 in SC. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1844 and graduated with the class of 1848. He was appointed brevet 2nd lieutenant of the 4th U.S. Artillery, then transferred to the 5th U.S. Infantry, then the 8th U.S. Infantry. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant in 1849. He served about 7 years on the Texas-Mexico frontier with James Longstreet, until he was assigned as an instructor of infantry tactics at West Point in 1857. In 1858 he rejoined the 8th in Texas. In 1861 he resigned from the U.S. Army and was made a captain in the Confederate Army. On September 26, 1861 he was announced as Chief Commissary of the Western Department under General Johnston. He was appointed major on November 11, 1861. He was captured at Fort Donelson in February of 1862 and imprisoned at Fort Warren. He was exchanged c. May and returned to duty as depot commissary in Gainesville, AL, where he met Lucy Reavis. They courted and were married December 16, 1863. Jackson was stationed at various sites throughout the remainder of the war. He was paroled at Gainesville on May 13, 1865 following General Richard Taylor’s surrender. He remained in Gainesville with Lucy to raise their family and work as a merchant and farmer.

Letter – William Farries, 6 July 1864

2015.002.096

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Sergeant William Farries of Company E, 24th WI Infantry, to his brother, from a camp near Vining, GA. Farries writes that he is unsure how long his regiment will rest, for as long as Ulysses S. Grant is fighting near Richmond, VA, they must press General Joseph E. Johnston in GA. He describes a charge at Kennesaw Mountain made by the 14th Corps against General William Hardee’s Corps. Farries writes that the Union division was poorly handled resulting in heavy losses. Farries writes that General William T. Sherman forced Johnston into a different position across the Chattahoochee River. He also mentions that from a hill near camp, he is able to see the tops of some buildings in Atlanta.


-Page 1-

Camp near Vining Ga

July 6th 1864

Dear [???]

I do not know what is the reason but I dont get any letters from you now. I do not think I have received a letter from you since I last [???]. We have had a rough time for the past two weeks but at present we are having a little rest how long it will last I am unable to say but I do not think it will last long for as long as Grant is fighting near Richmond we must press Johnson here. On the 27th of last month our Division & Davis’s of of the 14th Corps made a charge against the rebel center held by Hardees Corps our Division was so poorly handled that the rebels repulsed us with but little trouble our loss was heavy I never saw men fall so fast in all my life the rebels had a cross fire on us with both artillery and musketry and instead of being ordered forward on the “Double quick” we were halted and told to lie down what they were waiting for I could never ascertain our men stood it some time when they got up and ran back to our breastworks without orders our loss will show whether

-Page 2-

the men acted right or not the loss in our small Division was nearly 800 more than one fifth of the men engaged the loss of our Regt was slight compared to some of them and the reason was we were in the rear line Gen Harker commander of the 3d Brigade was killed he was a brave officer and his loss is severely felt hy his command the only field officer killed in our Brigade was Col Chandler of the 88th Ill. the loss in our Co was two Wm Shallock wounded in the face & G. Urbatsh (a new recruit) flesh wound in the thigh A. Denny got a slight rap from a spent ball but not enough to prevent him from doing duty. Gen Sherman has forced Johnson from one position to another he has forced him a cross the Chattahoochee River & the left of our army is within ten or twelve miles of Atlanta from a hill a short distance in the rear of our camp we can see the spires & several prominent buildings in Atlanta (I forgot to tell you that our Corps is on the extreme left) the left of our army all moved to the right when Johnsons fell back from the Kennesaw Mountains. Byron Albert has returned to the Co but he has not brought my watch I do not know the reason why he did not bring it. I wish John would send it by mail for a watch at home is of but little use to me tell him to put it in a little box and I think it will come through all right. My health is as good as usual and I hope this will find you all the same tell Arty to write to again

Your Brother William


William Farries, from Wauwatosa, WI. He is listed as a farmer, born in Scotland, about 5’9″, with hazel eyes dark hair, and a fair complexion. He received a $25 bounty for enlisting for 3 years service. He enlisted on August 6, 1862 as a corporal in Company E, 24th WI Infantry. He was later promoted to sergeant, and was wounded November 25, 1863 at Missionary Ridge, TN. Sgt. Farries was mustered out of the army June 10, 1865 at Nashville, TN.

Letter – J.P. Graves, 7 September 1864

2015.002.093c

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

Letter written by Private J. P. Graves of the Warren County MS Light Artillery, Army of TN, to his sister, from a camp near Jonesboro, GA. Graves writes that most of his battery was captured by Union troops, although he and a few others escaped. He goes on to describe the fighting at Jonesboro and writes that they did not leave their guns until the Union troops were on their breastworks, at which time some Confederate men “clubbed muskets with the enemy.” Graves ran to safety as the Union troops mounted their works. He writes that Captain Charles Swett gave a speech to the troops, telling them they had the thanks of Generals Hood, Hardee, and Cleburne for their gallantry on the battlefield. Graves expects to be a regular scout for Hardee, as Lieutenant Harvey Shannon sent the order to Hood for approval.


-Page 1-

Camp near Jonesbourogh

September the 7/64

Dear Sister

I received Sallies letter the other day would of answered it sooner but did not have any paper as the yankees captured every thing I have, I expect you have heared that our Battery was capture and nearly all of Govans Brigade. Bud, Graves Tennent and myself escaped unhurt I expect you would like to know what Graves Tennent is doing in our Battery. He came up a bout two or three weeks ago and joined our Battery. He is a very good and nice boy. He says he left Holly Spring a bout three months a go. Aunt Mary and Cousin George Bird was well. Well I reckond you want to know something about the fight at Jonesbourough. Hardees Corps and Lees Corps were both at Jonesbou

-Page 2-

rough. Hardees Corps was on the left and Lees Corps was ond the right Ond the 31st of August Hardees and Lees Corps was ordered to charge. Hardees was succesfull and Lee was not. The next day Hardees was ordered to the right to contend with the whole yankee army; as Lees Corps was ordered back to Atlanta The enemy was seen to bee massing their whole army in our front our Battery commenced playing ond them; Then the enemy brought up four Batteries and commenced playing and our battery. we keep up the artilery duel until all of our limbers to the guns were shot down. all that time the enemy was massing in a hollow about three hundred yards on our front then they commenced charging. the first charge they were hurl back and skattered like leaves in a whi[r]l wind, but the[y] went back under the cover of the hill and

-Page 3-

formed again. They came again but were repulse[d] with the same result; all the time our battery was pouring double charges of canister in to their ranks. by this time their reserved lines had got up. and they come again with overwhelming numbers and our men were driven back with the loss of hald of Govans Brigade and Swetts and Key Batterys, we never left our Guns untill the enemy were ond our Brestworks some of our men club[b]ed muskets with the enemy. we lost seventeen men out of our Battery They were will wounded or captured when I run I thought the yankees would put a bout fifty bullet holes throug my back; but as it happens not a one touched me. I know that nothing safe me but the prayers of my mother. The yanky were mounting our works when Graves Tennent and my self left both of us came out safes–

-Page 4-

Captain Swett came down to the battery day before yesterday and made a long speach to us saying that we had the thanks of Generals Hood Hardee & Cleburne for gallantry showed on the field. Captain Swett complimented us very highly; and said he considered evry man of us a Hero. I expect we will now be regular scouts for Gen Hardee as Lieutenant Shannon says evry thing has been sent off to General Hood; and he expects and answer from him to day. and if Gen Hood grants it we will have a pritty nice time. we will be mounted. I have a great deal of news to tell you but have no paper. Bud is well. Tell Sallie I will answer her letter soon. I [sentence illegible]… love to you all. give my love to sister Sallie and Ma and except [accept] a share for your self

believe me as ever your affectionate Brother

J.P. Graves


J.P. Graves enlisted on March 20, 1864 in Dalton, GA in Captain Swett’s Company L, the Warren Light Artillery. He survived the war and is shown on a muster roll of Confederate soldiers paroled at Greensboro, NC on April 26, 1865.

Letter – J.P. Graves, 25 April 1864

2015.002.093a

Hi-resolution scans of the full document can be made available for a fee. Please see our Image Request page for details.

WARNING: This letter contains racist slurs. We neither support nor condone the use of such language and have therefor decided to censor the words out of consideration for our readers.

Letter written by Private J. P. Graves of the Warren County MS Light Artillery, Confederate Army of TN, to his sister, from camp near Dalton, GA. Graves writes that he would have written to his sister earlier, but paper is scarce. He mentions General Joseph Johnston’s recent grand review of his army. Graves stood right next to Johnston, as well as General Hardee’s wife and daughters, and describes the general’s daughters in detail. Graves writes that General Johnston has ordered breastworks, and that their Union prisoners are expecting the Confederates to win the next fight. After returning from guard duty, Graves writes that General Francis A. Shoup, the Chief of Artillery, wanted to give Parrott rifles to the battery, but Lieutenant Shannon refused the rifles as they were used.


-Page 1-

Camp near Dalton

April the 25/64

Dear Sister

I received you letter the day I wrote to Sallie and was very glad to hear that you all was well. I would of answered your letter sooner but as I am scarce of paper I thought I wouldnt write but once [a week?] General Johston had a Grand review of his army last monday Lieut Shannon excused me from going out with the Company and I went out as a spectater took my stand right by Gen Johnston

-Page 2-

and Gen Hardees wife and daughters I never saw so many men in my life. I got tired looking and I went back to camp I wreckoned you would like to know if Gen Hardeess Daughters are pritty; I dont think so If you think Miss Anna Person is pritty Miss Hardee is pritty also Miss Hardee is a bout the size of miss C Trenten; The Elder one I am speaking of; The younger one is not as pritty as the Elder one. you said Miss Julia Barnett felt slighted by not receiving a not[e] from Lieu Shannon He told me to tell miss J Barnett that he expected to thank he in person That is

-Page 3-

he expected to get a furlough and come down there. He also said that he thought it was a Great deal of impropriety in writing to a school girl. We expect to have Stirring times up hear soon Gen J– is throwing up breast works hear the yankee prisoners say they think we will whip them in the next fight our army is in fine spirits I expect to go out and see Bud to morrow or the next day Tell Webster and Forest they must take good care of my puppy and all of you must take good care of my chickens I must go over to the guard house now as I am on guard. I will write when I come back. I have just

-Page 4-

return from Guard mount and will continue to write Gen Shoup wanted to turn our battery into a parrot battery but as he wanted to give us some guns that had been used Lieut Shannon would not take them Captain Swetts is acting inspector general of artilery and Lieu S– takes command of our battery Semples battery from Montogomery is in our batalion and and their is some very nice boys in it! Powell is in that Company. I went over to the 19 Lousiana yesterday and saw Sam Dinkins he is well and says he has not got a letter from home in a long time I give my love to ma & Sallie & the ******* Bill & Prince as well

I remain your affectionate Brother

J P Graves


J.P. Graves enlisted on March 20, 1864 in Dalton, GA in Captain Swett’s Company L, the Warren Light Artillery. He survived the war and is shown on a muster roll of Confederate soldiers paroled at Greensboro, NC on April 26, 1865.